What is the true chronology of Ancient Egypt?

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,613
Italy, Lago Maggiore
In scientific field measurements are a very serious matter. They have to be considered context by context. If I want an extreme accurate measurement of the dimensions of a pan I can use a long digital caliper. Ok, but where is the pot? On the fire? I will obtain a very accurate measurement influenced by the thermal expansion of the metal. I take take the pot off the fire and I put it in the water. After 5 minutes I measure it again using my fantastic digital caliper: I get a different measurement. But both the measurements are correct. The difference is generated by the context. So that who reads the data has to interpret it according to the context.

The problem is not the method or the instrument, the problem is the scientist reading the data.
 
Jan 2015
966
England
In scientific field measurements are a very serious matter. They have to be considered context by context. If I want an extreme accurate measurement of the dimensions of a pan I can use a long digital caliper. Ok, but where is the pot? On the fire? I will obtain a very accurate measurement influenced by the thermal expansion of the metal. I take take the pot off the fire and I put it in the water. After 5 minutes I measure it again using my fantastic digital caliper: I get a different measurement. But both the measurements are correct. The difference is generated by the context. So that who reads the data has to interpret it according to the context.

The problem is not the method or the instrument, the problem is the scientist reading the data.
Indeed, so if you don't know the exact circumstances of the pan you're trying to measure, you have to recognise and accept that your measurements might be skewed in ways that you can't possibly know.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,613
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Indeed, so if you don't know the exact circumstances of the pan you're trying to measure, you have to recognise and accept that your measurements might be skewed in ways that you can't possibly know.
Yes, and it's valid in all directions ... and I expect that who measures something is the one who knows the context. Anyway it's not difficult to check a context.

And this is why in physics the act to measure is extremely important. How can you determine a physical law if you cannot trust your measurements? [Then QM came introducing the uncertainty principle to make things even more interesting ...].