What is your favorite ex-USSR country (excluding Russia, of course)?

Jun 2017
277
maine
#43
Georgia--I find Georgian history to be compelling. I became interested when I was challenged by a clerk for not having brought proof of naturalization when I first applied for a passport (I was born in Georgia--USA). When I read how really fascinating that country's history is, I half wondered if my parents hadn't made a mistaken choice in geography.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jun 2013
485
Connecticut
#44
The Ukraine. Historically it's as interesting as any place on earth. It's difficult and a challenge to study its history. No matter what era you dive in to, it seems to become exciting and convoluted. I'm definitely not an expert on Ukraine but in reading about their history I've come to a broad, very generalized, conclusion.
Firstly they have been an oppressed people. BUT in their quest for autonomy they seem to always side with a more evil faction than the one they're trying to escape.
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#45
For obvious reasons as I have family there, Estonia. It's also a pretty well run place with underrated food - kind of one 1:6th Scandivian, 4:6ths German/Polish and 2:6ths Russian. While I don't consider myself Estonian I also can't help but feel a slight tug on the heartstrings when I see how good things overall seem to be going for them. Also they have "Kohuke":

1560375352001.png

Besides Estonia I've been somewhat interested in the early history of Armenia for quite a while, and I've yet to try some wine from the Caucasus. If we are counting Eastern bloc countries overall and not just straight ex-USSR republics then I'd pick the Czech Republic. I really like the Czech Republic.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,736
SoCal
#46
For obvious reasons as I have family there, Estonia. It's also a pretty well run place with underrated food - kind of one 1:6th Scandivian, 4:6ths German/Polish and 2:6ths Russian. While I don't consider myself Estonian I also can't help but feel a slight tug on the heartstrings when I see how good things overall seem to be going for them. Also they have "Kohuke":

View attachment 20635

Besides Estonia I've been somewhat interested in the early history of Armenia for quite a while, and I've yet to try some wine from the Caucasus. If we are counting Eastern bloc countries overall and not just straight ex-USSR republics then I'd pick the Czech Republic. I really like the Czech Republic.
I never went to Estonia. It does sound like a mini-Finland, though. :)

I actually have a great-aunt (maternal grandmother's younger sister) who lives in Estonia. She's ethnically Belarusian and speaks Russian, though--so she's definitely a minority there.
 
Jul 2016
1,233
Dengie Peninsula
#48
Slovenia, Ljubljana, The capital has a wonderful riverside walk. The caves at Postanya are worth a visit. A small train takes you about 3 km into the mountain , loads of tites and mites. If you ever want to remember which way stalagmites and stalactites go. Just remember the woman sitting on an anthill. The mites go up and the tights come down! There are blind Salamanders, deep in the mountain.
 
Likes: Futurist

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,000
Lisbon, Portugal
#49
Since I've been in China since 2016, I met probably more than a hundred people from Ex-Soviet countries, particularly from Central Asia and the Caucasus. It would be impossible for me to meet people from those countries if I continued to live in Portugal.

I don't know why, but Georgia seem to be one of my favorite, next to Ukraine.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,789
Western Eurasia
#50
For obvious reasons as I have family there, Estonia. It's also a pretty well run place with underrated food - kind of one 1:6th Scandivian, 4:6ths German/Polish and 2:6ths Russian. While I don't consider myself Estonian I also can't help but feel a slight tug on the heartstrings when I see how good things overall seem to be going for them. Also they have "Kohuke":

View attachment 20635
it looks like a local variant of syrok/сырок, it is originally a Soviet-Russian sweet made from curd cheese and covered with chocolate. One of the truly great legacy of the USSR. :D We also have a local version of it (called túró rudi in Hung) and everybody loves it here, although most people aren't aware of its origin from the SU :))
 

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