What Made the Anglo-Saxons Capable of Conquering the Britons?

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
There are a couple more types:


  • A-bracteates (~92 specimens): showing the face of a human, modelled after antique imperial coins
  • B-bracteates (~91 specimens): one to three human figures in standing, sitting or kneeling positions, often accompanied by animals
  • C-bracteates (best represented, by ~426 specimens): showing a male's head above a quadruped, often interpreted as the Germanic god Woden.[1]
  • D-bracteates (~359 specimens): showing one or more highly stylized animals
  • E-bracteates (~280 specimens): showing an animal triskele under a circular feature
  • F-bracteates (~17 specimens): as a subgroup of the D-bracteates, showing an imaginary animal
  • M-'bracteates' (~17 specimens): two-sided imitations of Roman imperial medallions
 
Jan 2014
2,546
Westmorland
If by Class 1 you refer to a category of Anglo Saxon Stone Scultpure, analagous to say Pictish Class 1 stones, I don't find it surprising simply because there isn't much of anything.
No - I'm talking about Class I inscribed stones. They aren't Anglo-Saxon at all. The point is that the stones are seen as demonstrating the existence of literate Christian elite across post-Roman western Britain. There's 250 or so of them, divided into roughly three time periods. The commentator who queried why there were none in supposedly Christian British Elmet did not engage further with the issue. As I mentioned last week, I think these are the questions we should be asking.
 
Jan 2014
2,546
Westmorland
Have any hanging bowls been found other than in a pagan furnished burial?
I think so, yes.

You are trying to make a circular argument, though. Or, at least, you are trying to make an argument based on the absence of evidence, which is a curious way to go about things. The existence of hanging bowls in furnished graves does not prove that they must also have existed in places where there are no furnished graves.
 

Haesten

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,918
I think so, yes.

You are trying to make a circular argument, though. Or, at least, you are trying to make an argument based on the absence of evidence, which is a curious way to go about things. The existence of hanging bowls in furnished graves does not prove that they must also have existed in places where there are no furnished graves.
The Brits were Christians is probably the explanation for their hanging bowls not surviving.