What Materials were Clothing in Germany Made of in the 15-16th Centuries?

Apr 2017
1,662
U.S.A.
What materials were common clothing (the majority of clothing worn by average people) in Germany (or the Holy Roman Empire/German Kingdom) made of in the 15-16th centuries?
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,244
Sydney
The poor walked either barefooted or with wooden clogs , leather shoes wore off very quickly and had to be repaired often
there were some wood soled shoes with leather straps
 
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Matthew Amt

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
2,995
MD, USA
Wool was the most common fabric from the Bronze Age through the 18th century, being readily available, though it must be remembered that ALL fabrics took an amazing amount of work to produce! But sheep will thrive just about anywhere. Linen is a little more finicky for where it grows, so it was often imported, but was widely used for undergarments even in the lower classes, as well as fine overgarments. Not sure what "urtica" is, but hemp and bast fibers were also known, generally as options for linen.

Everyone except some beggars had shoes, but it would certainly be normal to see peasants going barefoot at times, especially kids, if only to save wear and tear on their shoes. Wooden clogs were a good sturdy substitute in some places, for work and day to day wear.

Leather was used for some garments, varying from fine doublets for rich men to foul-weather cloaks, etc.

Matthew
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,075
Lorraine tudesque
Wool was the most common fabric from the Bronze Age through the 18th century, being readily available, though it must be remembered that ALL fabrics took an amazing amount of work to produce! But sheep will thrive just about anywhere. Linen is a little more finicky for where it grows, so it was often imported, but was widely used for undergarments even in the lower classes, as well as fine overgarments. Not sure what "urtica" is, but hemp and bast fibers were also known, generally as options for linen.

Everyone except some beggars had shoes, but it would certainly be normal to see peasants going barefoot at times, especially kids, if only to save wear and tear on their shoes. Wooden clogs were a good sturdy substitute in some places, for work and day to day wear.

Leather was used for some garments, varying from fine doublets for rich men to foul-weather cloaks, etc.

Matthew

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