What peace terms could the Ottomans have expected if Gallilipoli would have been successful?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#1
What peace terms could the Ottomans have expected if the Gallilipoli landings would have been successful and the Ottomans would have subsequently become willing to make a separate peace with the Entente Powers?
 
Mar 2019
1,193
Kansas
#2
What peace terms could the Ottomans have expected if the Gallilipoli landings would have been successful and the Ottomans would have subsequently become willing to make a separate peace with the Entente Powers?
No. After the war it was discovered that even if the landings had been 100% successful they would not have met their stated objective. Mount Achi Baba was nowhere near as high as they thought it was :(
 
Apr 2019
100
Ireland
#4
This really is an interesting scenario, because if the Gallipoli campaign was successful (by this I would understand the capture of Istanbul) before Russia was eliminated there would have been the seeds for a future muddle concerning a post-war settlement here. Russia had long had designs on the straits. I would say at the very least they would have lost the European bridgehead and the Levantine coastline (I don't think the Arab revolt started till June 1916).
 
Dec 2011
4,718
Iowa USA
#5
What peace terms could the Ottomans have expected if the Gallilipoli landings would have been successful and the Ottomans would have subsequently become willing to make a separate peace with the Entente Powers?
If I recall correctly the second push, the last attempt to drive Turks off of the peninsula was in Late June or early July of '15.

By this time was Gorlice-Tarnow in motion, or just about to break out? Without Russian manpower I very much doubt the Entente could have occupied Constantinople.

A successful operation doesn't equal occupation of the Ottoman economic center (Constantinople, already was not the capitol city of the Young Turks -- Ankara). A successful operation allows supply of Russia by warm water ports... which was possibly extremely helpful in the third or fourth year of the war.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#6
If I recall correctly the second push, the last attempt to drive Turks off of the peninsula was in Late June or early July of '15.

By this time was Gorlice-Tarnow in motion, or just about to break out? Without Russian manpower I very much doubt the Entente could have occupied Constantinople.
The Gorlice-Tarnow offensive would ironically help Russia by shorting its front lines in Eastern Europe due to the fact that it would get rid of Russia's Polish salient.

A successful operation doesn't equal occupation of the Ottoman economic center (Constantinople, already was not the capitol city of the Young Turks -- Ankara). A successful operation allows supply of Russia by warm water ports... which was possibly extremely helpful in the third or fourth year of the war.
Wasn't Constantinople the economic hub of the Ottoman Empire even after its capital was moved to Ankara, though?
 
Dec 2011
4,718
Iowa USA
#7
The Gorlice-Tarnow offensive would ironically help Russia by shorting its front lines in Eastern Europe due to the fact that it would get rid of Russia's Polish salient.



Wasn't Constantinople the economic hub of the Ottoman Empire even after its capital was moved to Ankara, though?

Sorry I was typing fast there, friend.

My comment was that after Gorlice winding down that Russia didn't have the manpower to occupy Constantinople. Of course Constantinople as the economic center of the Empire. Still... if the British naval brass demonstrated more, well, brass, we'll never know.
 
Likes: Futurist
Feb 2019
601
Serbia
#8
If I recall correctly the second push, the last attempt to drive Turks off of the peninsula was in Late June or early July of '15.

By this time was Gorlice-Tarnow in motion, or just about to break out? Without Russian manpower I very much doubt the Entente could have occupied Constantinople.

A successful operation doesn't equal occupation of the Ottoman economic center (Constantinople, already was not the capitol city of the Young Turks -- Ankara). A successful operation allows supply of Russia by warm water ports... which was possibly extremely helpful in the third or fourth year of the war.
Gorlice-Tarnow wasn't about to break out, it was about to end. I don't know about the fortifications of Constantinople in the period but due to its size and the armies around it as well as the position playing into the advantage of the Central Powers I would imagine that the Entente would have to bring something bigger to capture it.

As for the peace treaty, the French would probably try for the Levant and the British would take Mesopotamia for the oil. Russia would undoubtedly want Constantinople but I doubt the Entente would let them get it, after all: Possession is 9/10ths of the law and since the Entente would possess it...

Russia would probably try to get Trebizond and parts of Armenia, some parts like the ones inhabited by Greeks might try to revolt.