What rendered modern women's rights possible?

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,235
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#12
Assuming that you mean in Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand and limiting consideration to the 20th century, I'd say that it was women's suffrage (which was instrumental in bringing about universal male suffrage in Britain). The development was further fueled by the two world wars during which women had to assume a greater war. Economics was largely behind the rise of the 2-income family: as women played a greater role in the paid workplace, costs rose to meet the amount of money available.
Yes, the suffrage changed a lot the condition of the women: they became politically important [a vote is a vote]. But probably we have to step back to 19th century ... since we could wonder why Western democracies allowed women to vote. Just the second part of the quoted post is a great clue. Women, working and being paid, became economical subject and independent, in a certain degree, from the me. Without the capability to gain money to live a woman should depend on a man [as it was the social rule in the far past]. This situation begun slowly to change already in 19th century. Even if, clearly, women got a very little salary at the beginning [if they got some money]. But we can say that the industrial revolution started the process which made women independent economical subjects and so politically important [politicians had to allow them to vote, because women were able to finance politicians, to organize themselves in lobbies ...].

I have made it really simple, but economically independent women meant a greater demand and a wider circulating monetary mass. At that point it was obvious that they were going to vote.
 
Likes: duncanness
Jun 2017
278
maine
#13
I have made it really simple, but economically independent women meant a greater demand and a wider circulating monetary mass. At that point it was obvious that they were going to vote.
I think that you're right: economics--and property--and the vote were quite linked. If I can step back to the 19th century, the 1840's and 1850's saw a sweep of laws that assured a woman's right to control her own property (almost always inherited).
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,422
#15
The right to vote , absolutely !
and a sense of fairness from the men ,
they fought , suffered and died for centuries fighting for their voices to count
denying it to women didn't seems right somehow
Exactly. A number of publicly active, writing women already in the French Revolution realized that freedom and equality wasn't necessarily something for the blokes only, even if "brotherhood" would seem to gainsay that. But then they literally lost their heads over it. The 19th c. was very much a period when considerable effort was expended on shutting women out of professional and public spheres of all kinds, more so than previoiusly when compared to the 17th or 18th centuries in fact. But much of that effort to push women out the public sphere of society was always inherently paradoxical and inconsistent.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,085
#18
What about before 1870 and after 1920?
No idea I just did a quick google on women in teh workforce, this came up and covers the peroid of woman's struggle for the vote. Thought gives context to dicsussion of the ecnomic factor. Though I do not particularly buy it the way it is expressed.

But I will say this, any group once they have a degree of economic rights generally seeks political rights.
 

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