What time period did Jesus die?

Apr 2017
138
Bayreuth
#32
There is no year “0”, the AD calendar begins in the year “1”, before that we have "1" BC.
Yeah, very funny.
He meant by that - in the period from BC to AD... and you would be more than suprised how many historians do that.
In the year zero or around zero - is a very common saying based on the astronomcial year numbering and more common way of counting around the globe, what everybody knows who deals with a lot of cultures and you of course knew as an expert of the antiquity and I just write because I have some letters left.

The period of Jesus is the iron age. It depends on in what field you want to talk. In archeology we call it iron age.
 
Nov 2010
7,547
Cornwall
#33
The period of Jesus is the iron age. It depends on in what field you want to talk. In archeology we call it iron age.
Is it? Never really thought about it but it looks like, historically speaking, it may well have been about that in Britain, but not in the Near East or Med, which had already left it behind.

Just asking!
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,401
Portugal
#34
… and you would be more than suprised how many historians do that.
Maybe, but I confess that I never heard or saw a historian doing that… so, yes, you can say I would be more than surprised. For instance in a conference, in Coimbra or in Porto he would be certainly commented. Not necessarily in a good way.

Is it? Never really thought about it but it looks like, historically speaking, it may well have been about that in Britain, but not in the Near East or Med, which had already left it behind.
Sometimes archaeology has its own language, especially when the dating has a wide amplitude, but I am also not used to see that terminology for Jesus.
 
Apr 2017
138
Bayreuth
#35
I messed up with the quote button.
@Tulius /JohninCornwall
Then it is maybe a language thing. I just looked up something better for John and got that again.
Why that is not normal is because we talk about the antiquity as a result of the development from the iron-age. But you can try to convince the church of removing antiquity and talk about iron age Jesus. Good luck.^^ That is why I said to OP - you have to say where you want to talk or put this?
LaTene goes till the Birth of Christ, then you got the Roman periods up to 400 AD, but they still count as iron-age. In general it goes up to 800 more or less.
That the ME is faster than us - should be taken for granted.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#36
If he had examined it a little less he might have lived a little longer.
Still, Socrates lived to 70, not bad for that period of time .


I messed up with the quote button.
@Tulius /JohninCornwall
Then it is maybe a language thing. I just looked up something better for John and got that again.
Why that is not normal is because we talk about the antiquity as a result of the development from the iron-age. But you can try to convince the church of removing antiquity and talk about iron age Jesus. Good luck.^^ That is why I said to OP - you have to say where you want to talk or put this?
LaTene goes till the Birth of Christ, then you got the Roman periods up to 400 AD, but they still count as iron-age. In general it goes up to 800 more or less.
That the ME is faster than us - should be taken for granted.
When it comes to the more advanced areas of Mediterranean, while the time of Jesus is technically in the iron age, standard practice is not to refer those regions and time with those terms. You don't talk about iron age Roman Empire, since it is understood that the Roman Empire is wholly within the Iron Age, and use of the term would be an unnesswry redundancy with Roman. Terms like "antiquity" and "classical" are used instead.

Since we know that Jesus lived in the first century, typically the more specific term "1st century" or "2nd Temple" period is used instead when talking with regard to Jesus. Herod.
 
Oct 2009
3,515
San Diego
#37
"Is Jesus the son of God?"- well, Not if you ask Jesus. Asked twice, he denied it twice and always called himself the Son of Man.

And, sure, He was crucified... but no worries, as a lot of folks will tell you he bounced right back, fit as a fiddle.

Jesus had a really bad weekend for your sins.
 
Jul 2011
108
Alpha Centauri
#38
Commonly it is said that Jesus was born in a year 1 AD, but that can't be correct, because Herod the Great who wanted Jesus' head died in 4 BC and Jesus was allready two years old refugee in Egypt when Judean client king went belly up. So, he is rather born in a year 6 BC and lived to be 33 years old in time of his crucifixion, which puts those proceedings in a year 27 AD.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#39
Commonly it is said that Jesus was born in a year 1 AD, but that can't be correct, because Herod the Great who wanted Jesus' head died in 4 BC and Jesus was allready two years old refugee in Egypt when Judean client king went belly up. So, he is rather born in a year 6 BC and lived to be 33 years old in time of his crucifixion, which puts those proceedings in a year 27 AD.
Actual most scholars don't think Jesus was born 1 AD, but assume a date around of 6 - 4BC. The birth narratives.of Luke and Matthew need to be taken with a good deal of skepticism, and many/most scholars think they are largely the invention of the Gospel writers. A date of 27 AD would be consistent with what Luke says, Jesus beginning his preaching during the governorship of Pilate, and Jesus being around 30 years old when he began to preach.

The assumption that Jesus was 2 years old when the Magi visited him is not stated in any ancient source and is just an estimation by modern historians. While the Magi were most unlikely hanging around the manger with the shepherds as commonly depicted, there is nothing in the ancient sources that actually state it was not so.
 
Sep 2014
1,185
Queens, NYC
#40
I'm afraid I can't buy that story about people having to go to their ancestors' hometowns/homelands during a census. That is not the way a census operates. A census is taken to determine the number of people in a certain place.
Can you imagine the disruption sending people all over the place to their families' origins would cause?