What was life like for a neolithic farmer in ancient Europe?

Aug 2016
977
US&A
#1
I'm curious what life was like for a Neolithic farmer in ancient Europe. What sort of tools did they use? What sort of animals did they raise? What crops were grown? How did they sell their produce?
 
Dec 2015
60
NZ
#2
Would 'Prehistoric Europe', edited by Barry Cunliffe, be what you're looking for? For Britain, the Quennells' old 'Everyday Life in Prehistoric Times' still has some interesting things to say; and there's part 4 of Rodney Castleden's 'The Stonehenge People'.
 
Mar 2015
861
Europe
#3
I'm curious what life was like for a Neolithic farmer in ancient Europe. What sort of tools did they use? What sort of animals did they raise? What crops were grown? How did they sell their produce?
Sell to whom?
Everyone else was also a farmer. They had to consume their produce - needed to produce mostly everything they consumed.
Ask it this way: what, if anything, did they buy?
What did they import?
They were Stone Age people. Large areas of world donĀ“t have stones - they have just sand and clay. Stone Age people living there must import all stone. Among areas which do have stone, not all stones are equally good for tools. Some, like flint, obsidian and jade, are better than other stones, but not found in all places stones occur.
For those reasons, Stone Age people widely imported stone.
But how? Did the tribes living away from neolithic flint mines travel as mining parties to mine flint, and return home with flint without paying anybody for the flint? Or did they pay the tribes living permanently near the flint mines?
 
Sep 2017
737
United States
#5
I'm sure they laughed, cried, got angry, happy, depressed, etc. as all humans throughout history have. I wonder what kind of traditions and philosophy they had.
 
Dec 2011
2,350
#6
Lots of land available, but most of it full of giant weeds, known as trees, and chopping down large trees was extremely difficult because iron blades were not widely available.

I suspect that they started with raising livestock, such as sheep, which, as well as providing clothing and meat, would help keep land clear of trees.

Wild animals such as boar, bears and wolves would have been very troubling.
 
Mar 2017
75
France
#7
Keep an eye of Art and you'll find some answers about cattle they bred / goddesses they worshiped / trends in human life...
Goddess and Gods of Old Europe from Marija Gimbutas is a good vector to check on this bias
 
Aug 2014
4,679
Australia
#9
Lots of land available, but most of it full of giant weeds, known as trees, and chopping down large trees was extremely difficult because iron blades were not widely available.
Bronze axes were just as good at chopping down trees as iron ones. The problem with bronze is that it was expensive. Iron was cheaper and more plentiful, enabling a lot more axes for a lot more people. Of course, in the Neolithic, they didn't have bronze axes either. In the Neolithic, chopping down trees would have been extremely time consuming and labour intensive. I think that one of the chieftain's roles would be to ensure that trees were cut down and land cleared to allow his people to expand. It would be a tangible and very visible indicator of his success as a leader.
 
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