What was London like in Roman times?

Mar 2019
9
Madeira, Portugal
#1
The Roman empire extended up to Hadrian's wall. Evidently, the Romans had a settlement on the Thames
called Londinium, from which the city of London we know today developed over the many centuries. What was
the Roman Londinium like, and how did residents of Londinium coexist with the more indigenous peoples of
Londinium's surrounding countryside of that time?
 
May 2017
860
France
#2
I think it couldn t bee very different from Lutecia:little harbour,villages of fischermen,paludism,slow penetration of the Roman civilization,tentatives to liquidate the local coutums and to adopt the roman law...I think the coexistence was more difficult in the north with the Scots.
 
Mar 2018
724
UK
#3
I think it couldn t bee very different from Lutecia:little harbour,villages of fischermen,paludism,slow penetration of the Roman civilization,tentatives to liquidate the local coutums and to adopt the roman law...I think the coexistence was more difficult in the north with the Scots.
I expect it would be rather different. Britain was never Romanised anywhere near as successfully as Gaul. The urban centres were a lot smaller and more spread out, Latin was a lot less widespread use in the rural population, and the sheer distance from the Mediterranean (plus the difficulty of crossing the channel) meant that was simply a lot wilder a place. Now that's about Britain as a whole rather then Londinium, but I expect that would have been reflected in the city.
 
May 2017
860
France
#4
For the roman navy who had a lot of greeks specialists formed during the battles of the mediterranean sea,the cross of the Channel,with gaellic embarcations of the "venetes", was nothing.It was more dificult for Napoleon.
 
May 2017
860
France
#5
And for the Law,Guillaume,duke of Normandy, discovered in 1066 that his "norman lawyers" were less trong in Roman Law than the English ones,situation which proved that the propaganda of the invaders was an ideology of penetration and occupation.
 
May 2017
860
France
#8
I ask myself if the worse manipulators are not the members of the clergy,with their pretented intelectual superiority,and also the lawyers of the high aristocracy,with their falsificated teories like the "salic law" etc...It would be very interesting to know where took place the most ancient court of England,and the intelectual influences of their members.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,144
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#9
I ask myself if the worse manipulators are not the members of the clergy,with their pretented intelectual superiority,and also the lawyers of the high aristocracy,with their falsificated teories like the "salic law" etc...It would be very interesting to know where took place the most ancient court of England,and the intelectual influences of their members.
What does this have to do with the thread?
 

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