What was London like in Roman times?

Mar 2018
663
UK
#22
Was Wales pacified? Obviously the Welsh had an uneasy relationship with the English, so I suppose the Romans were
also not that welcome...
Yes, Wales was as pacified as everything south of Adrian's Wall. Not very populated due to the terrain however. There was no difference in population/culture between Wales and England until the Saxons and later Normans arrived. Neither Wales nor England were separate entities in any sense.
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
13,787
Navan, Ireland
#23
Was Wales pacified? Obviously the Welsh had an uneasy relationship with the English, so I suppose the Romans were
also not that welcome...
Yes and No -- 'Wales' was a source for resistance against Roman invasion and indeed two legionary fortress' were in Wales or close to the 'border' (Caerleon and Chester). The hill tribes were most likely never fully pacified but the coasts and better land were and indeed were amongst the last 'Roman' places in Britain.

However there was no such place as Wales at the time and there wasn't conflict between the Welsh and English because the English weren't living in England at the time and would not be for several centuries. The language of Britain would have been 'Welsh'.

The native Britons only became 'Welsh' after the 'invasion' of Britannia by the 'English' at the fall of Rome.
 
Likes: Edratman

Haesten

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,884
#24
The few Roman towns in Wales start to be fortified in the 4th century.



Neither Caerleon or Chester appear in the Notitia Dignitatum, by the late 4th century the defence line appears to be the Fosse Way with German mercenaries stationed there.
Irish settlers or Foederati start to arrive.

 

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