What was the first Civilization?

Jun 2018
6
Unknown
#1
Hi gays,


I am new in this forum, I am a beginner history student. First I want to know about what was the first Civilization ever lived I am confused someonw said this one is old and someone said that was the oldest. I have to know with the latest research.


hope so forum will be helpful for me.


Thank You!
 
Jan 2010
4,354
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#3
The Mesopotamian Civilization is said by this site to be the oldest:

World History Timeline | Essential Humanities

Wikipedia produces the following:


Bronze Age and Early Iron Age
  • c. 3200 BC: Sumerian cuneiform writing system.
  • 3200 BC: Newgrange built in Ireland.
  • 3200 BC: Cycladic culture in Greece.
  • 3200 BC: Norte Chico civilization begins in Peru.
  • 3200 BC: Rise of Proto-Elamite Civilization in Iran.
  • 3100 BC: Skara Brae in Scotland.
  • 3100 BC: First dynasty of Egypt.
Note the Norte Chico civilization in Coastal Peru:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norte_Chico_civilization
 
Jun 2017
2,555
Connecticut
#4
Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus River Valley and China are the four main basins of civilization.

Mesopotamia and Egypt were the most successful. Mesopotamia is older but Egypt rose to greater heights at an earlier date unifying quite early when Mesopotamia wasn't united until far later when the Akkadian Empire came around and not again for awhile after that collapsed.
 
Nov 2016
76
Užice, Serbia
#5
Completely depends on what you classify as a civilization. There are many primitive cultures that have emerged since the Neolithic revolution (around 10.000 BC) that could be classified as civilizations, but are simply regarded as "cultures". I'd personally say that a civilization is differentiated from a culture by a clearly defined societal structure and system of governance, and by that definition Sumerian city states constitute the oldest civilization on the planet.



The Sumerians were not quite like any other people in their origin; they are considered to have been a language isolate (not related to any other), and they have no modern descendants. Their civilization has brought us the cuneiform writing system, the first irrigation systems ever and "The epic of Gilgamesh", which might be the first novel of all time.

Civilizations would come into existence wherever the conditions were right: arable land, a large source of water and flat terrain that is ideal for architecture. For these reasons the oldest civilizations would usually appear around basins of large rivers.



Hopefully you already know some of them. I hope this helped.
 
Jun 2017
2,555
Connecticut
#6
Completely depends on what you classify as a civilization. There are many primitive cultures that have emerged since the Neolithic revolution (around 10.000 BC) that could be classified as civilizations, but are simply regarded as "cultures". I'd personally say that a civilization is differentiated from a culture by a clearly defined societal structure and system of governance, and by that definition Sumerian city states constitute the oldest civilization on the planet.



The Sumerians were not quite like any other people in their origin; they are considered to have been a language isolate (not related to any other), and they have no modern descendants. Their civilization has brought us the cuneiform writing system, the first irrigation systems ever and "The epic of Gilgamesh", which might be the first novel of all time.

Civilizations would come into existence wherever the conditions were right: arable land, a large source of water and flat terrain that is ideal for architecture. For these reasons the oldest civilizations would usually appear around basins of large rivers.



Hopefully you already know some of them. I hope this helped.
I will say this chart is a little misleading as it puts some classical and even middle age civilizations on the map next to truly ancient ones while ignoring most classical civilizations. There are only five civilizations on that chart from 2000 BC or earlier(the four river ones and Greece) and then there's Nubia and Askum in the classical period then all AD civs.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2018
6
Unknown
#7
Thanks for reply.


I have come to know that The worlds oldest "civilization" is the Australian Aborigine, who have been around for 50K years, and possibly as much as 100,000years.

The Aborigines are still here, and many still live in the traditional "Stone Age" nomadic manner.
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
#8
I had always understood "civilization" to mean a culture with writing.

Then they can speak for themselves across the millennia.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,209
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#9
I had always understood "civilization" to mean a culture with writing.

Then they can speak for themselves across the millennia.

Yes, that's the difference between a culture and a civilization: a civilization is able to record and preserve its memory.


Not only writing actually [we have to deal with a recent evolution of the conception of civilization] ... otherwise we are going to be no more a civilization since our history is going to be more and more digitized [starting from a voice telling this or that ... may be commenting a nice documentary].
 

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