What would people think of the late 1990s

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,757
Iraq
#31
The graphics of video games were primitive but yeah, we didn’t know any better and I remember regularly spending hours playing 8-bit Nintendo. Even this was an improvement over the computer games I played in the 80s.

The difference compared to today is that you can take your iPhone anywhere. I remember the game boy looking so bad compared to the NES and it was pretty much unplayable outside in the sun. I didn’t keep mine for long. There were little miniature TVs too back then but they never really became popular.

I read books on my phone so I think there are times when you think people are just wasting time on instagram when they might be reading a book or the news. It’s not always that different from how people would look at a book or newspaper before.

Also it’s not just young people on their phones all the time.
 
Feb 2016
571
ROK
#32
And of course consoles and home computers were on the rise in the 90's.
It was on the rise towards current levels. It didn't reach current levels yet at that time. I used to play outside with my friends everyday when I was a kid. (Our parents rarely took me and my sister out to travel, so it was almost everyday that I played outside with my friends). Occasionally, after a bike ride or a ball game, we went to one of our friends' home who had a game console. I guess it depends on the region and which part of the 90s (the early part or the later part). I lived in a town where kids played outside without their parents. It was safe when compared to the cities. Btw, I was actually a kid during the 80s.

A lot of the modern console games have various achievements and prizes (such as infinite ammo or alternate costumes) that take a long time and are very difficult to accomplish. I never spent more than two hours in a day on a console game when I was a kid. Thankfully, I finished my current games and achievements, and I stopped playing those.

When I was a kid, only one of my friends was overweight. None of my relatives were. Today, most of my younger cousins are overweight. The age gaps between me and them are wide and they're in their twenties. And yet I'm still healthier than they are.

In the current day however you walk into a house, everyone has some sort of device within hands reach. So I think it's fair to say, now more than ever, with everyone looking at a screen, not many kids are going to be playing outside. Especially when they have a whole world in their hands.

I'm also sure this trend will not go away. At least for a long time.
I'm seeing this with my nephew, too. I hear people say that they won't buy any phones for their kids, but I'm afraid that the kids would think of it as unfair because nearly every kid has a phone.
 
Last edited:
Aug 2016
977
US&A
#33
Less people owned game consoles before the 2000s. And I think the modern games are more addictive than the 90s ones. The modern ones certainly take longer to complete and the graphics are much more visually appealing.
I don't think newer games necessarily take longer to complete. Fallout 1 and 2 can be played for hours and hours, while some modern shooters have campaigns that can be finished in two or three hours. Even a speed runner can't complete The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time in less than four hours without exploits.
 
Jun 2018
148
New York
#34
It was on the rise towards current levels. It didn't reach current levels yet at that time. I used to play outside with my friends everyday when I was a kid. (Our parents rarely took me and my sister out to travel, so it was almost everyday that I played outside with my friends). Occasionally, after a bike ride or a ball game, we went to one of our friends' home who had a game console. I guess it depends on the region and which part of the 90s (the early part or the later part). I lived in a town where kids played outside without their parents. It was safe when compared to the cities. Btw, I was actually a kid during the 80s.

A lot of the modern console games have various achievements and prizes (such as infinite ammo or alternate costumes) that take a long time and are very difficult to accomplish. I never spent more than two hours in a day on a console game when I was a kid. Thankfully, I finished my current games and achievements, and I stopped playing those.

When I was a kid, only one of my friends was overweight. None of my relatives were. Today, most of my younger cousins are overweight. The age gaps between me and them are wide and they're in their twenties. And yet I'm still healthier than they are.


I'm seeing this with my nephew, too. I hear people say that they won't buy any phones for their kids, but I'm afraid that the kids would think of it as unfair because nearly every kid has a phone.
I've seen that too, and it for sure depends on the location you grew up and which part of the 90's. I'm young, born in the later part of the 90's. So even now I'm looking back at it as a decade in a historical context in many respects. I may not have been clear on when I said home console and computers were on the rise, but I did mean exactly what you have said. They were on their way to what we see today.

But these are just my observations on this specific part of the decade on what will be thought of it. People will probably more readily look at the politics of the decade in the academic sphere. Especially compared to this decade and the coming one.
 
Apr 2019
80
U.S.A.
#35
Ah, the 1990’s, good job but still was trapped in prison. Finally was able to break out in ‘99. Never looking back, there is little I miss of those days. Free at last, but it was a better day when you checked you message machine at home unless you carried a “beeper”
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,798
Western Eurasia
#37
Being a teenager back then I liked it, the future looked brighter, but i think it was not only due to my age, people were more optimistic in general around me, there still was that naivity that we will once catch up Western European living standards, didn't imagine that we may live permanently worser than our parents and of course the return of racist, authoritarian or "illiberal" regimes and major political forces. Oh and I agree with everybody who criticize the current smartphone-zombie age. It is alarming, we can't even grasp its long term physiological, mental and social effects on ourselves but also giving it irresponsibly into the hands of toddlers.... I kinda start to appreciate the Amish and the Luddites. :D
 
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macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
3,991
Slovenia, EU
#38
Being a teenager back then I liked it, the future looked brighter, but i think it was not only due to my age, people were more optimistic in general around me, there still was that naivity that we will once catch up Western European living standards, didn't imagine that we may live permanently worser than our parents and of course the return of racist, authoritarian or "illiberal" regimes and major political forces. Oh and I agree with everybody who criticize the current smartphone-zombie age. It is alarming, we can't even grasp its long term physiological, mental and social effects on ourselves but also giving it irresponsibly into the hands of toddlers.... I kinda start to appreciate the Amish and the Luddites. :D
Lol, were you living in a socialism? Because if you were not then racist, authoritarian or "illiberal" regimes never went anywhere and if you were: well, it was an authoritarian and iliberal regime in socialism. I suppose that today's left are feeding you fairytales about back then.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,798
Western Eurasia
#39
Lol, were you living in a socialism? Because if you were not then racist, authoritarian or "illiberal" regimes never went anywhere and if you were: well, it was an authoritarian and iliberal regime in socialism. I suppose that today's left are feeding you fairytales about back then.
The point of reference was my own country where I was a teen in the 90s, no it was no longer socialist (regime change happened in 1989) and the gov wasn't authoritarian and illiberal back then here (though ironically the very same guy is at charge now who was also in the late 1990s). Sure it was not the same in other countries in the region (Tudjman, Milosevic, Meciar were the illiberal authoritarian guys of the 90s, but they all gone by the end of the century), but in my country I think nobody really imagined that things would turn out to be the way it is now, probably not even Orbán himself (he was sitting in the Liberal Internationale until 2000 :))
Naively thought that the new democratic institutions were stronger, economic prosperity will come after the EU integration, we catch up Austria in our lives etc :D Well it was before the great political disillusionment in the 2000s.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,707
Sydney
#40
the fall of the Berlin wall , the end of the USSR , the promises of the internet
Europe making great strides forward with the Euro ,
beside bad music the 1990 were a pretty cool time to be
 
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