What's going on in Venezuela?

Jul 2017
123
Europe
The USA better keep their eyes on it, as they do not want a Russian presence too close to them
As I said in my previous post, I’m afraid that a proxy war between Russia and America is possible in Venezuela. On a second thought, most of the Latin America is in the U.S. sphere of influence and Russia knows it would be hard to influence any sort of changes there, unlike in Syria who was a Russian ally for decades and they had military base there which they had to protect by all means.

Russia doesn’t have any geopolitical interests in Venezuela except to cheese off Americans, and I doubt they would go as far as using military force there.
 
Mar 2019
13
Amsterdam
The short answer is a revolution against the current government. People are fed up with the current political situations that have caused skyrocketing hyperinflation, power cuts and shortages of food and medicine. In addition, more than 3 million Venezuelans left the country in recent years to look for a better life. Which caused a political situation where the country has 2 leaders. One is Juan Guaidó, who self-declared an acting president with majority supporters being the angry citizens of Venezuela. And President Nicolás Maduro, who had been sworn into a second six-year term in office. With dubious results. And huge criticism for the country's decline. However, it is not that easy to overthrow a leader that has the backing of the army.

But the problem doesn't stop here. The whole Venezuelan situation escalated from the national level to international when foreign governments started to intervene. By voicing support of one or another leader and even influencing the national problem further by denying access to funds that are held in England by the English government. Or providing rioting gear like China did. Furthermore, there are many different information coming out about the situation in the country. Propaganda, fake news, or alternative truths. Which makes it hard to know exactly what is happening in the country. There are simply to many contradicting stories. However, we could solve this issue by using third party providers that aim to be immutable sources of information like Historia project.

But for now, all we know is what we can read. Thus it is important to recognize opinion pieces vs actual news and not to forget to double or even tripple the facts you read in one source with as many as possible sources from different circles.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,128
San Antonio, Tx
My original nationality is India, but currently America. Indian work ethic is known for laziness, and it has created a culture of its own there so much so that the current Indian prime minister vowed to eliminate it when he took office. Not sure how successful he has been since such behaviors are so rampant. It is a country where most people travel by trains but they are so dirty inside and outside though people are paid for the task. Trains are always overcrowded and hardly run on time. Same with the general cleanliness in streets and so on. If one goes to a bank one gets annoyed because they treat you as a nuisance that makes them work. These behaviors are much more observable to an outsider compared to a native, since he/she has gotten used to it.

Acknowledging what is wrong is the first step needed to fix it. If one can't even do that, how could one ever fix it? Reading what you wrote, I get this feeling that Greece is not going to change.
Narendra Modi cautions IAS officers against corruption, laziness, despondency - Times of India
I enjoy living in the US but I do so with my eyes wide open. There’s plenty of shady activity around here, especially with the current, lamentable administration, but those are current affairs.

I used to visit India regularly back in the early 60s: fascinating place, filled with very intelligent people who are a bit overwhelmed by the simple scale of the corruption on the ground. It took my parents 5 years - yes, years - to get a hard-wired telephone installed in their Bombay apartment.

Back in the early 80s we visited Venezuela and things were already headed downhill at that time with lots of security measures. No place is perfect, but some are more perfect than others.
 
Mar 2019
525
Kansas
Back in the early 80s we visited Venezuela and things were already headed downhill at that time with lots of security measures. No place is perfect, but some are more perfect than others.
I have lived in the US for about 10 years. And you are absolutely right. The US is far from perfect, but still a better place to live than 90% of the rest of the world. But really when you are only dealing with 1st world problems you are indeed having a good life :)
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,128
San Antonio, Tx
I'm not sure how "regime" came up in the discussion, we were speaking about Marxists and I replied having the democratic Marxist parties of non-Communist Europe in mind.

I too have the same perception of the term "regime" though, as something not associated with democracy.
I don’t think the word “regime” in contemporary US politics necessarily refers to a dictatorship.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,128
San Antonio, Tx
That is very interesting, Tulius. As I haven't followed the situation in Venezuela closely, there are many things I don't understand. What do your acquaintances with their inside knowledge have to say about all this? How did the situation climax like this, from the days when Chavez offered cheap oil to US poor to these talks about US intervention, the riots and all this mess? What happened in between? And what's to be done, without involving bloodshed and foreign interventions?

I don’t know what the current price of a gallon of gasoline is in Europe at the moment, but what I do notice is that the price of a gallon of gasoline around 1930 in the US, is approximately the same as the price of a gallon of gasoline in the US today when adjusted for inflation.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,128
San Antonio, Tx
So the US is the ONLY power in the entire world capable of pulling off a successful military intervention.
My advice is: Don’t do it. Especially with someone as unstable as the current pres, it can only lead to disaster and hatred for the US. We need more enemies - after having offended nearly everyone else in the world - like we need more guns in America.
 

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