When did Lithuania acquire gunpowder weaponry?

May 2019
391
Earth
Cannons, firelances, handgonnes, etc. Anyone know when the Lithuanians started using them? Did they have any before the conversion to Christianity in 1387, or did it all come afterward? And from which direction (eastward from the Poles and Germans, westward from the Mongols and Russians)? I've heard mention of cannons at Grunwald in 1410, but I don't know if any of it belonged to the Lithuanian forces...
 

janusdviveidis

Ad Honorem
Mar 2014
2,023
Lithuania
As far as I know Lithuanians started using gunpowder weapons in 1382 they learned about such weapons from Germans who first used bombards one year earlier in 1381 against Naupilis. For a while both stone throwers of old style and cannons were used together. First manufacture of canons locally started at 1551.
 
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May 2019
391
Earth
As far as I know Lithuanians started using gunpowder weapons in 1382 they learned about such weapons from Germans who first used bombards one year earlier in 1381 against Naupilis. For a while both stone throwers of old style and cannons were used together. First manufacture of canons locally started at 1551.
Interesting. Are there any details surviving about these early cannons that the Lithuanians used during the 14th-15th centuries (e.g. materials, size, weight, etc.)? And do you know anything about handheld firearms in Lithuania?
 

Zip

Jan 2018
767
San Antonio
This thread has me thinking of the rye bread from Bruno's Lithuanian bakery on the South Side of Chicago. Can't get good bread like that here in Texas.
 

janusdviveidis

Ad Honorem
Mar 2014
2,023
Lithuania
My interest are mostly before gunpowder age. Overall, I would expect Lithuanians to use same handguns and cannons as in Western Europe with very small gap, maybe couple of years. Latter, largest difference in Lithuanian and Polish armies were heavy reliance on heavy cavalry when in Western Europe cavalry mostly were used to support infantry.

P.S. Real sour dough bread is truly national food of Lithuanians. For many years Historians thought that my ancestor used to eat serials ect., but in many archaeological sites there were finds of unknown burnt material. Recently someone brought that stuff to test in modern laboratory and what a surprise, it was rye sourdough bread. It seems that such bread was Lithuanian staple food for thousands of years.
 
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Jun 2011
318
The Old Dominion
Sourdough . . . good stuff. The starter batch I use is direct line descent from the batch my mother brought east to Virginia from California in 1945 when she came back after the war. She got it from a friend who'd lived in California all her life. No telling when someone first mixed it up. I've tried making new sourdough starter from scratch. Not that hard to do, but I could tell a difference in bread made from the new starter batch versus the old and the old had a better flavor. Just an experiment, I gave the new starter batch away. Still either use it to make something or feed it once a month.