When did the British class system 'end'?

Aug 2008
208
Auckland
#11
Constitutional monarchy is pretty popular I can think of about 18 of them and that is not counting those of the British Commonwealth who still regard the British Monarch as Head of State.
Legally, she isn't referred to as the British Monarch in the Commonwealth, she is equally the Queen of New Zealand, as she is Queen of the United Kingdom, and Northern Ireland

But you're right :D
 

galteeman

Ad Honorem
Apr 2008
2,198
Sodom and Begorrah
#12
Legally, she isn't referred to as the British Monarch in the Commonwealth, she is equally the Queen of New Zealand, as she is Queen of the United Kingdom, and Northern Ireland

But you're right :D
Northern Ireland is in the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
#16
When did the British class system 'end'? I don't know about such things, but didn't it take 'severe blows to the head, neck, and shoulders' during 1914? Isn't that when a great number of the very sort of aristocrat you might want to breed shouted, "Follow me men!" and fell in a hail of machine gun bullets?
 

avon

Forum Staff
May 2008
14,253
#17
When did the British class system 'end'? I don't know about such things, but didn't it take 'severe blows to the head, neck, and shoulders' during 1914? Isn't that when a great number of the very sort of aristocrat you might want to breed shouted, "Follow me men!" and fell in a hail of machine gun bullets?
Perhaps ... but then, the aristocracy, albeit with significant assistance from the 'upper middle class', still dominated British politics until well into the early 1960s. Without going too far into it, Chamberlain, as a PM who came from a mercantile background, still had to fight against the aristocrats. Think of the 'Cliveden Set', the aristocratically-dominated Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corp etc. etc. Although WWI did decimate the British aristocracy, their system of rule still remained.
 
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#18
Northern Ireland is in the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
True, but for all the other monarchies of which she is Queen (eg Canada, Australia, New Zealand) they are separate Crowns which happen to be held by the same person. Queen of Canada, Queen of Australia, etc - they are not the same crown, except in the case of the United Kingdom.

These are interesting cases that show exactly why getting rid of the Queen wouldn't even make a dent in class differences in Britain. All three of them have the Queen, and arguably all three of them have even less separation between classes than, say, the US. Therefore it's not the Queen who is at the root of the social phenomena and it won't go away by removing her (probably, it would just be an antagonizing factor that actually increases class defensiveness).
 
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May 2007
1,755
Australia
#19
Legally, she isn't referred to as the British Monarch in the Commonwealth, she is equally the Queen of New Zealand, as she is Queen of the United Kingdom, and Northern Ireland

But you're right :D
In Australia, HRM is known as Elizabeth, Queen of Australia. On the Australian carriage in the Royal Mews there is just E painted on the door, and not E11 coz Australia has not had two Queens named Elizabeth. Australia had a referendum a while ago to see if we wonted to get ride of the Queen of Australia and it was not supported.

I actually asked the same sort of question about the class system here before I went to the UK. After being in London and working in a palace where this class thing is well and truly alive, I would say the class system has not ended.
I could go on all day about the comments I got from English people about being Australian and working for HRM, and some of them were not nice. As I was always nice to people and did not give anyone any reason to be rude to me, I can only say there is definite class system going on. Some people did look down at their nose at me, or could this be just racisim?:confused:
 
Aug 2008
208
Auckland
#20
In Australia, HRM is known as Elizabeth, Queen of Australia. On the Australian carriage in the Royal Mews there is just E painted on the door, and not E11 coz Australia has not had two Queens named Elizabeth. Australia had a referendum a while ago to see if we wonted to get ride of the Queen of Australia and it was not supported.

I actually asked the same sort of question about the class system here before I went to the UK. After being in London and working in a palace where this class thing is well and truly alive, I would say the class system has not ended.
I could go on all day about the comments I got from English people about being Australian and working for HRM, and some of them were not nice. As I was always nice to people and did not give anyone any reason to be rude to me, I can only say there is definite class system going on. Some people did look down at their nose at me, or could this be just racisim?:confused:
In New Zealand, she is known as Her Majesty,Elizabeth the Second, By the Grace of God, Queen of New Zealand and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith
On the subject of Regnal numbering, I'm all for the Monarchy, but I'm more for New Zealand, and I find it a bit offensive that she is referred to as Elizabeth II, when New Zealand did even have Elizabeth I (New Zealand wasn't even discovered by Europeans at the time).

Personally, I think regnal numbering should start from George III, he was the reigning Monarch when Capt. James Cook proclaimed New Zealand for Great Britain.

Oh well, Elizabeth II will do.