When did the US make the dollar our national currency?

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,804
Sydney
#11
the Maria Theresa thaler remainded a currency up to the 20th century , much apreciated in the middle East
Mussolini got the right to mint them for his African territory , they are still struck to this day by the Austrian mint
many can be found as part of ladies necklace in the middle East and East Africa
under coranic law a women has no divorce property right but her jewelry is her own
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,125
Spain
#12
I don't want to sound like our Spanish posters, but "dollar" referred to Spanish 8 reales or 1 peso coins in colonial America. $ also was an abreviation for Spanish pesos, the letters S and p on top of each other.
You should sound, you should sound.. why not.. if you are talking truth. The Dollar symbol is a Spanish one. It is based on Spain´s coat of arms: The Pillars of Herakles (Hercules): Rock of Gibraltar and Monte Hacho in Ceuta.




The symbol $ means: the motto: PLUS ULTRA and the Hercules´ Pillars

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The Spanish Dollar in 1752

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The word Dollar came from german thaler, talero or taler...that came from bohemian language word Tolar..

How and why the word Dólar (Sp.) arrived to America?

The answer is in who ordered coin Real de 8! It was Charles I of Spain and V of Germany. Charles ordered coin Real de 8 with the same quality that the coins coined in Bohemia where were the "Thaler"... a coin coined in Joachim´s Valley (Joachimsthal) (German was as bohemian language as Czech). Thaler name came from Joachinsthal and had the origin in word Guldengroschen.. a bohemian coin very popular in the Holy Roman Empire or Kingdom of Germany if you prefer. The Guldengroschen were silver coins coined in Joachim Valley. As Spaniards had to go there by Charles´order to know how to do it the coins....they adopted the word Tálero or Táler.. and when they arrived to Spain.
From Tálero and Táler, Europeans mostly British, French, Dutch used the word Thaler, Tholer etc to name the Spanish coins...and from Tholer... Doller and from Doller... Dólar, Dollar.
That is the reason because the word Dollar means in USA Spanish currency at early: Spanish Daller... From Spanish Daller to Spanish Dollar and then only Dollar.

Everybody wanted Spanish coins: not only in USA... but in China, Persia... Arabia... Ottoman Empire... it is funny in 1800 the most used coins in Arabia (Medina, Mecca) was the Spanish Duro or Spanish Peso...

In fact, the word English POUND (Libra) is the literally translation to English language from the Spanish word PESO... the Duro or the Peso was the first currency in USA and it came when Spain sent money to the American rebels in 1776 (Different question is why Spanish currency was used in USA and not French... but it is a mystery for me. I know Spain sent lot of money after Mr Franklin reached an agreement with the Catholic King in Aranjuez.. but why not French currency? or Dutch currency?)...

From Spanish Duro or Real de 8 came the symbol used in Dollar today as I explained up. For many years.. Dollars used the Spain´s Coat of arm...


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Alabama Dollar.. you can see the Spanish Coat of Arm: The Two Hercules´ Pillars, NON PLUS ULTRA motto, and the 4 kingdoms: Castile-Lion-Navarra-Aragón and the Fleur de Lys symbol of the House of Bourbon.




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A New York Dollar.. also with the Spain coat of arm


The last Dollar (well at least the last USA Dollar stamped with the Coat of Arm of Spain I know it was coined in 1861). But Still, the symbol $ is the is the representation of that coat of arms... watching a current dollar makes me want to scream ... ¡Viva el Rey! :)
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,873
#13
You may be right about the origin of the $ being the pillars of Hercules on Spanish coins. Most of the online sources I found disagree, but in any case it was originally Spanish peso or 8 reales coins that it referred to.

I couldn't find the dates on the bank notes you posted. It would be interesting to see how late they were using Spanish currency. The pictures are to reassure customers distrustful of paper money that the notes are redeemable for the coins shown. Also, the Spanish peso had more silver than a US silver dollar, so it was making clear they were redeemable for Spanish currency.

The Currency Act of 1857 made foreign currency no longer legal tender. When Spain lost the territories with silver mines, there was probably a reduction in the use of Spanish currency, but Mexican currency was substituted to some extent.

My understanding is that the English pound was named because it was originally a pound of silver. Later it was 4 ounces of silver and now about 1/12 of an ounce of silver and silver is low historically compared to gold. The £ symbol is a translation of pound to libra, which is the same word in Spanish and Latin. Online sources indicate it was a translation to Latin not Spanish.
 
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martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,125
Spain
#14
Betgo.. the Spanish currency was the official currency in the Kingdom of Siam (Thailand) till 1875.. so I guess in USA was banned in 1857 according you wrote.. but I guess it was in market till 1870-1875... I guess.

Here a Dollar from Connecticut. year 1858. You can see the famous US symbol: The American Eagle and motto UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.. back the American Eagle you can see the Crown of Spain and the word HISP

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And this one is from Mississippi.. year 1862 in full war. The stamp is similar to the used in Connecticut. But you can see better the motto

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And this one is from Virginia... printed in July 1861... almost the same day took place the battle of Bull Run (or Manassas Junction). In this dollar we ca see in good condictions the Crown of Spain, Hercules´ Pillars, the motto PLUS ULTRA, the symbols of the kingdom of Castile and Lion (Castilla y León) and the title: HISPAN ET IND REX 8 R JP that means Real de 8 (Hispaniarum et Indianarum Rex that means King of Spain and the Indies) and the fleur de lys, symbol of the House of Bourbon.


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So I guess Spanish Dollars were used in USA till 1870-1875... but I am not sure.

Regards

The symbol $ I have not doubt it was based on the Coat of Arm of Spain.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,873
#15
Confederate money was close to worthless, so it isn't surprising they would put pictures of Spanish silver on certificates.

I agree the the $ does look like part of the Spanish coat of arms. The S could also be for Spanish.

I don't know when US money became more prevalent than Spanish money. The cheer goes "two bits, four bits, six bits, a dollar", and a quarter is still sometimes referred to as 2 bits.

Spanish money was standard world wide, as to some extent US money is now. Although they aren't silver, US dollars are much more solid than many local currencies. In Europe, local currency was mostly used. It might not be that much to brag about though, as most of the Spanish gold and silver coins did not stay in Spain.

The English pound dates to 700 or before, when I don't think Spanish silver was an issue. It was originally one pound of silver equal to 240 silver pennies, which were a little smaller than dimes. In times when Spanish silver was circulating, the pound was about 4 ounces of silver, worth about 4 Spanish dollars or 5 US dollars.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,514
Dispargum
#16
I don't know how correct it is to say that Spanish dollars were still used in the USA in the 1870s based only on graphic depictions. The symbols probably remained in use only for tradition. People recognized and acknowledged the symbols as meaning money, not necessarilly where the money came from. The symbology was used to encourage people to have faith in the money's value.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,873
#17
I don't know how correct it is to say that Spanish dollars were still used in the USA in the 1870s based only on graphic depictions. The symbols probably remained in use only for tradition. People recognized and acknowledged the symbols as meaning money, not necessarilly where the money came from. The symbology was used to encourage people to have faith in the money's value.

Putting Spanish dollars on a certificate implied it was redeemable for Spanish dollar, which were worth more than US dollars. It may or may not have been true, but it wasn't just for tradition.
 
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Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,514
Dispargum
#18
Putting Spanish dollars on a certificate implied it was redeemable for Spanish dollar, which were worth more than US dollars. It may or may not have been true, but it wasn't just for tradition.
I can believe that in earlier times the Spanish dollar had a stronger reputation than the US dollar but not as late as the 1870s.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,873
#20
I can believe that in earlier times the Spanish dollar had a stronger reputation than the US dollar but not as late as the 1870s.
It wouldn't matter if the country that minted the coins no longer existed. What mattered was a Spanish dollar had more silver in it than a US dollar. "Cold hard cash" meant cold hard gold and silver coins. Paper money was usually certificates supposedly redeemable for gold or silver. They could be issued by a back or a government.

The US dollar was a copy of the Spanish dollar, but about 27g rather than 28g and about the same percentage silver. Therefore Spanish money was preferable, and a certificate redeemable in Spanish dollars would be worth more.
 
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