When did white Southerners become loyal to the US after the ACW?

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,675
#21
Most of those leaving went to British Honduras, where there were less problems with language, religion, and culture, although the climate was difficult. However, they mostly blended in with the British community there. In Brazil, the climate was more acceptable, but they lived in communities where they could keep their religion and language. Some of the Brazilian Confederados now are part black due to looser racial lines there.

I don't think many went to Cuba. The climate was acceptable, but it was Spanish and you probably had to be Catholic or willing to officially convert. Very likely the South Carolina slave owners mentioned were Episcopal and willing to practice Catholicism. Some of the planter elite were high Church Episcopal partially descended from English Catholic petty aristocratic families, such as Jefferson Davis who went to Catholic schools. There were also Catholics in Louisiana and the Gulf Coast.

Remember the majority of white southern families did not own slaves and only a small percentage owned 20+ or 50+ slaves. Most white southerners were unhappy about black political power during Reconstruction. However, in the upper south, many people blamed the war on the deep south planters, who had a bad reputation before the war for making huge profits from particularly brutal plantations. People also blamed blacks and New England abolititionists. The Civil War was seen as a disaster, but not sure how bitter most ordinary southerners were towards the US government.

My grandmother from Virginia said that the Spanish American War was the first time many southerners felt patriotism. By that time, as another poster pointed out, the Jim Crow system was firmly in place.

People started flying the Confederate flag in the 1950s and 1960s in opposition to integration. They started flying the Confederate flag over the Statehouse in Alabams in the 1950s. Before that most southern states flew just the state flag over government buildings and not the US flag. I believe that many southern states still do that.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,371
Sydney
#22
Probably by the 1910's and the rebirth of the Klan
unlike the first one , the second one had success in the Midwest Union states
Indiana ,Kansas .. those staunchest Union State , were deeply Klan
it created an ideological bond
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
13,824
SoCal
#26
"Some" would be more accurate.

Neo-Confederates are a tiny percentage of white Southerners.
Yeah, though much more Southerners place a lot of value on their state's and region's Confederate legacy. For instance, a majority of Virginians even in 2017 opposed tearing down their state's various Confederate statues.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,675
#27
I have relatives by marriage who went to Brazil, but came back because they didn't want their children to become Brazilian. One problem with British Honduras was that they didn't have slavery there. If you went to Cuba, your children or grandchildren would become Catholic and Spanish speaking, but a few people did that.

There were large numbers senior officers who fled accross the border to Mexico. They were kicked out when the republicans defeated Emporer Maximillion. Many of the political and military leaders also reached Cuba or the Bahamas and some went from there to England, Canada, or Europe. Most returned fairly soon when it was clear there would only to 2 or 3 executions.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,566
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#28
What about during the Indian Wars?
during the Indian Wars Texas had a lot of Indian raids and other troubles. Most southern states tended to vote against the good of the US Army in revenge for their defeat, but Texas voted more like a western state than a southern state when army appropriations were concerned because Texas still needed the US army to protect Texas from hostile Indians.

QUOTE="betgo, post: 3095792, member: 11624"]I have relatives by marriage who went to Brazil, but came back because they didn't want their children to become Brazilian. One problem with British Honduras was that they didn't have slavery there. If you went to Cuba, your children or grandchildren would become Catholic and Spanish speaking, but a few people did that.

There were large numbers senior officers who fled accross the border to Mexico. They were kicked out when the republicans defeated Emporer Maximillion. Many of the political and military leaders also reached Cuba or the Bahamas and some went from there to England, Canada, or Europe. Most returned fairly soon when it was clear there would only to 2 or 3 executions.[/QUOTE]

I once read something about modern descendants of refugee Rebels in Texas. Apparently the light skinned children in those communities playing in the tropical sun often got skin cancer.
 
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