When Germans begun to call themselves a Deutsches?

May 2015
48
Schertz ,Tx
To be honest i have no clue what they called themselves.My father's family was german. His mother's people lived in Riga and Libau, in Latvia before her father came to the United States. I believe they came from Pomerania and later moved to Latvia. It's from her my father got his berliner accent , because she taught my dad and Uncle Tom German, which grandpa would never do.Said we are in America , not in the old country so you speak english.
Now his family was Bavarian, and he had relatives in the Schwarzwald who were herditary foresters. My dad usually refered to himself as german first. He rarely described himself as bavarian , though i guess if someone asked where in Germany that would have been his reply, even though he had some relatives in Coburg which i believe was Thuringia.
 
Mar 2017
169
UK
Did HRE had citizenship?
I doubt it, I believe its states simply had membership in the HRE and thus being from that state made you a part of the HRE. I said citizen simply to avoid saying a Roman or a Holy Roman. I don't know if a person would consider the HRE as a part of their identity in the way that they would their state or ethnicity.
 
Mar 2017
169
UK
I think one problem we have with finding out what the common people would have called themselves is that, throughout history, sources from common people are notoriously rare.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
When Germans begun to call themselves Deutsches en masse?
Germanic speakers have referred to different peoples by tribal names and also by language for as long as we know. They germans referred to other germanic speakers as 'teuta', slavic speakers as 'wends' and celtic speakers as 'walhs' when talking about peoples in a general sense so, the slavic speakers in lower saxony lived in an area known as Das Wendland, the french speaking part of Switzerland, having been a former celtic speaking area, as Das Welshland and the german speaking area known as Deutschland meaning those who speak our language. They still did refer to individual tribes though such as the celtic speaking Boii, who lived in Boiihaemum, 'home of the Boii'. Modern italian refers to Germany, the country as Germania but to germans as tedesco, which is derived from teuta.

It is not easy when they started to think of themselves as german in a wider sense but by the term Deutsche Hanse or Düdesche Hanse, or in latin Hansa Teutonica in the 1100s. In England, we used the french term Allemagne and the Stahlhof in London was part of the Hansa Almaniae in 1282.

The Deutsche Orden or Order of Teutonic knights date back to the 1100s, even though the knights came from many different parts.
 
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authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
But Bavarians and Prussians spoke different languages.
If you are referring to the Old Prussians, that's right. They spoke a language related to modern Lithuanian but if you refer to later Prussians, they are different dialects, prussian being a low west germanic dialect and bavarian being a high west germanic language.