When Paris became capital?

Jan 2014
1,095
Rus
I'm taking the view that there was a distinct division within the Frankish Kingdom between the Gallic west and Germanic east that actually goes back to Roman times before the Frankish Kingdom existed. The Franks themselves lived within the Empire as "federateii" charged with defending the border against other Germanic tribes. With the fall of Rome, The Frank, Clovis, established a kingdom with a primarily Gallic population based in Paris. The later West Frankish Kingdom was still under the Western Carolingian dynasty until the Capet dynasty succeeded it in 987. The post-Carolingian Gallic state is generally known as the Kingdom of France.
As i understood Clovis kingdom wasnt based in Paris. Rheims was considered as title city. Orlean, Soissons was not less important than Paris too. There was some kind of fortuity that Clovis lived last years and died in Paris...I suppose that even can be more late falsification.

Division to West and East appeared in Frankish kingdom already in VII century by opposition of Austrasia and Neustria
 
Jan 2014
1,095
Rus
To say that the Frankish capital must either be Paris or Aachen (or any other single city) implies a unity that the Franks rarely had. More often than not, the Franks were ruled by multiple kings, each with his own capital. In the 150 or so years leading up to Charlemagne the Frankish realm was usually divided between Neustria in the west with its capital at either Soissons or Paris, and Austrasia in the east with its capital usually at Metz. Charlemagne's dynasty, the Carolingians, had come out of Austrasia so it was natural that they would base out of the east - Metz, Aachen, or some other eastern city.

In the earlier Merovingian times, Neustria usually dominated Austrasia, but the Germanic-speaking Austrasians always resisted assimilation with the more Romanized, increasingly Latin/French-speaking Neustrians. This resistance to assimilation usually expressed itself in the Austrasians usually finding a way to have their Frankish king independent or at least semi-independent of the Neustrian king. (Quite often the two kings were father and son or sometimes they were brothers, but each king had his own court and therefore a different set of advisors.)

Charlemagne ruling a unified Frankish Kingdom and holding court in the east, whether at Aachen or anywhere else, is something of an anomaly in Frankish history. Usually the Frankish realm was divided between multiple kings, kingdoms, courts, and capitals.
And when did Paris become singly dominant in Neustria at least?
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,091
Canary Islands-Spain
And what about capital? Paris became real capital in the time of Hugh Capet, isnt it?
Of course, because Paris was at the centre of the Capetian patrimonial territory, the Ile de France. That's the nucleous of the Kingdom. He was Count of Paris when he got the throne.
 
Jan 2014
1,095
Rus
Other inexplicable city was Sens. Paris obeyed to archdiocese of Sens in Church's sense. And its archbishops had title of primate of Gaul and Germany.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,490
Dispargum
Other inexplicable city was Sens. Paris obeyed to archdiocese of Sens in Church's sense. And its archbishops had title of primate of Gaul and Germany.
In Roman times Paris was a minor city. Apparently Clovis was the first to make it a major administrative center/capital. This may have been because Clovis and his wife Chlotilde greatly admired St. Genevefa who lived in Paris at the time.

In Roman times, Sens was a provincial capital. The archbishops usually set up in the provincial capitals. Unlike most Gaulic provincial capitals, Sens was centrally located in its own province.



And when did Paris become singly dominant in Neustria at least?
Can't help with this one. I'm a Merovingian specialist. The deeper one gets into Carolingian and Capetian eras I'm less and less useful.
 
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Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,395
Netherlands
Of course, because Paris was at the centre of the Capetian patrimonial territory, the Ile de France. That's the nucleous of the Kingdom. He was Count of Paris when he got the throne.
Not directly. I think it was his son who more or less took residence in the Palais de la Cite, as in those days being a count (and king) meant lots of traveling and I am pretty certain the "government" traveled with him. Otherwise I'd go with Louis 6 who really improved the palace and took fulltime residence there and iirc the archives stayed there when he traveled.
 
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