When people moved to the cities during industrialization, did they generally move to the cities closest to them or did they often move farther?

Futurist

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May 2014
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SoCal
When people moved to the cities during industrialization, did they generally move to the cities closest to them or did they often move farther to more distant cities?
 
Mar 2019
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Kansas
When people moved to the cities during industrialization, did they generally move to the cities closest to them or did they often move farther to more distant cities?
They went were ever the work was.

London, Manchester even Liverpool if they fancied becoming sailors
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
They went were ever the work was.

London, Manchester even Liverpool if they fancied becoming sailors
What about in other countries? The same rule applies? So, for instance, a sizable number of rural east Germans moved to cities further west (such as in the Rhineland) because that is where the jobs and industries were?
 

stevev

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Apr 2017
3,558
Las Vegas, NV USA
The Erie Canal was was largely built by imported Irish workers as were other big projects throughout the 19 th century. Imported Chinese workers built most of the railroads after the Civil War. US natives mostly worked close to home in agriculture or small businesses until the industrial boom. These workers would go to the factory towns of upstate New York, Pennsylvania and the Great Lakes regions. As railroads were built distance was less of a factor and the Great Lakes area became the most industrialized part of the country after the Civl War. Mines supported manufacturing and workers had to go where the mines were: Minnesota for iron ore and West Virginia for coal as well as other mining areas.

Big cities were less oriented toward heavy industry but provided jobs to immigrants in light industries like consumer goods, clothing and services.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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SoCal
The Erie Canal was was largely built by imported Irish workers as were other big projects throughout the 19 th century. Imported Chinese workers built most of the railroads after the Civil War. US natives mostly worked close to home in agriculture or small businesses until the industrial boom. These workers would go to the factory towns of upstate New York, Pennsylvania and the Great Lakes regions. As railroads were built distance was less of a factor and the Great Lakes area became the most industrialized part of the country after the Civl War. Mines supported manufacturing and workers had to go where the mines were: Minnesota for iron ore and West Virginia for coal as well as other mining areas.
BosWash was more industrialized than the Great Lakes were, no? At least that would have been my guess considering the extremely massive concentration of urban areas there.
 

Futurist

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May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Also, what I find interesting is that AFAIK few white Southerners actually moved north before the 20th century. Why exactly was this the case? After all, industrialization in the Northern US began way before 1900.
 

stevev

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Apr 2017
3,558
Las Vegas, NV USA
BosWash was more industrialized than the Great Lakes were, no? At least that would have been my guess considering the extremely massive concentration of urban areas there.
Yes. A variety of light industries existed in Boston and New York. Even in the late 19th century there was a large number of consumer goods that were manufactured . Moreover banks and investment houses hired thousands of poorly paid clerks to do what computers do now. There were jobs in transportation, trade and maintenance of the urban infrastructure. Retail trade employed many. Construction of housing and services oriented toward homeowners increased as these cities grew. New York also had over 50 newspapers at one time anticipating the Information Age. Nelley Bly, a native of PA could not have made her famous career as a journalist anywhere but New York.
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,558
Las Vegas, NV USA
Also, what I find interesting is that AFAIK few white Southerners actually moved north before the 20th century. Why exactly was this the case? After all, industrialization in the Northern US began way before 1900.
The South remained largely agricultural and the population grew more slowly at the time . They were just not inclined to leave if they could get by at home. Some left. Ty Cobb went to Detroit.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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SoCal
Yes. A variety of light industries existed in Boston and New York. Even in the late 19th century there was a large number of consumer goods that were manufactured . Moreover banks and investment houses hired thousands of poorly paid clerks to do what computers do now. There were jobs in transportation, trade and maintenance of the urban infrastructure. Retail trade employed many. Construction of housing and services oriented toward homeowners increased as these cities grew. New York also had over 50 newspapers at one time anticipating the Information Age. Nelley Bly, a native of PA could not have made her famous career as a journalist anywhere but New York.
That makes sense.

To clarify--why did you say that the Great Lakes became the most industrialized part of the US? Did you forget about BosWash or did the Great Lakes genuinely overtake BosWash in the late 19th century?
 

stevev

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Apr 2017
3,558
Las Vegas, NV USA
To clarify--why did you say that the Great Lakes became the most industrialized part of the US? Did you forget about BosWash or did the Great Lakes genuinely overtake BosWash in the late 19th century?
I'm talking about heavy industry. The Great Lakes provided the transport to move ore from the iron ranges of Minnesota to the factories on the lower lakes as well as the coal from PA and West Virginia. The eastern cities were not geographically situated nor disposed to want heavy industry. They were business, finance and trade centers. New York became the largest US city in the 1820s and remains so. The main "smoke stack" industries in that area are in New Jersey (where they should be).
 
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