Where could Spartacus' rebels have fled to?

May 2018
75
Bordeaux
#91
There is one man in word,who can help the slaves:Xiongnu Emperor.
Xiongnu Emperors many time accepted runaway slaves from Han.
İf they dont annihilated by Pirates and some İndo-europan nomads,they could be safe in Xiongnu borders.
But yes,this almost impossible
 
Jun 2014
1,221
VA
#92
Spartacus faced small armies led by bad commanders who didn't take him seriously. It's a pretty straightforward explanation.
While true those same small armies and bad commanders did easily defeat Crixus when he was leading essentially the same thing. I do agree the source material was likely just guessing as the Roman side did kill all the rebels but based on Crixus I think they guessed correctly that the Spartacus rebellion without Spartacus wouldn't have even gotten those victories over small armies led by bad commanders.

I do agree Spartacus' success has been hugely exaggerated in popular culture and his reputation today is more based on the movie "Spartacus" than the real man.
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,090
#93
Spartacus faced small armies led by bad commanders who didn't take him seriously. It's a pretty straightforward explanation.
Some will see that way, but remember Spartacus was not an army commander per se, just a bandit whose reputation had attracted a lot of malcontents besides finding opportunities to release more themselves. Further, Spartacus tended to avoid facing off against armies (one has to admit his decisions in that regard were pretty sensible) and relied on cunning. How could he do otherwise? Nonetheless, it must be noted that the small armies led by bad commanders were well capable of defeating the bands of Crixus and Oenemaus. In one account a legion sent to confront Spartacus early on are described as in poor condition and health. That might be true, It might be merely an excuse for poor performance. After tha decimation ordered by Crassus, suddenly the legions return to focused determination, something not entirely unusual in Roman military history.

The original resistance to Spartacus was from local citizenry acting in their own interests against a rapacious bandit gang. Their failure to oust Spartacus from Vesuvius (he camped on the side of the volcano, not the modern crater which did not then exist) led to calls for Rome to do something. Not really that suprising that Spartacus wasn't taken too seriously at first - I do actually agree with you on that - but the threat of Spartacus was growing just as fast as the Roman response, and it ought to be remembered that Roman Italy was not quite as settled and law abiding as most would as assume. Not until the domination of Rome in the mid imperial period was Italy a "safe place", and the only reason I say that is the lack of complaints in Roman sources for criminal behaviour beyond legionary acquisition in society in general.
 
Nov 2009
3,850
Outer world
#94
In addition to all that has been said, it's not like slaves and commoners (not even the nobility anyway) had the knowledge we have now: I mean, it's not like they could realistically plan to go to Cilicia "because Roman control in 71 BC was tenuous" or going to Dacia; they didn't have maps or much knowledge and, besides not speaking the language (especially Dacian), they had no information on the geographic and social features of other lands.
I would be surprised if even Spartacus had any working knowledge of most Italy, let alone the entire Mediterranean basin.
Realistically, as previously said, their best chances was to split up and keep a very low profile while scattering back to their homelands.
It's also interesting that a lot of slaves were also Italians, so they were basically condemned to death as it would be quite hard to mingle at the time of the biggest slave revolt up to that moment.
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,090
#95
I take your point, but don't ignore the power of word of mouth. trade with various parts of the empire and their neighbours was common enough and whils some ifo definitely would have been kept a secret, general rumour and gossip was always going to be a talking point.
 
Jan 2015
3,291
Australia
#96
I take your point, but don't ignore the power of word of mouth. trade with various parts of the empire and their neighbours was common enough and whils some ifo definitely would have been kept a secret, general rumour and gossip was always going to be a talking point.
It would have been like people searching for a semi-mythical land of gold they had heard whispers of. A miracle would have been required for them to get that far. Miracles sometimes happened (in different ages), I still have no idea how Peter the Hermit and his peasant followers (who at one point were following a duck) made it to the Holy Land; but once there they were wiped out in anyway, so all they did was delay the inevitable. In this case the host is even more unwieldy, and the opposition very much more organized. There is simply no way they survive for long outside Italy as a group (and divided they mostly die anyway).
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,090
#97
No, not really. Some of the stories would be the kind you describe. Some of it very real information passed on from contact with travellers. Regarding survival, I would point out that large movements show an astonishing ability to survive. We have examples from the ancient world and indeed, the evening news will also describe the stubborn determination of large groups migrating to what they hope will be a better future. The reality is harsh and terrible, but humanity isn't a successful species for nothing.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,830
Sydney
#98
the "stubborn determination of large groups migrating" come to an end when faced with the oldest traffic sign in history
heads on a spike
Crassus improved the signal by marking the Appian way with cross signs , everybody got the message
 
Jan 2015
3,291
Australia
#99
No, not really. Some of the stories would be the kind you describe. Some of it very real information passed on from contact with travellers. Regarding survival, I would point out that large movements show an astonishing ability to survive. We have examples from the ancient world and indeed, the evening news will also describe the stubborn determination of large groups migrating to what they hope will be a better future. The reality is harsh and terrible, but humanity isn't a successful species for nothing.
As was explained, those groups were different in that they had a pre-existing cohesive core and structure that held them together, and was designed for surviving a migration. Some random runaway slaves do not. Go back and read my earlier posts, don't make me explain it again.
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,090
That is exactly the tone of response that I will complain about. You are not an expert. You are not entitled to dismiss anyone else. You are not entitled to behave like you own the forums. Got it? If you don't have the ammunition to continue an debate, then stop. No-one will worry about it. But attempting to dismiss others in such a negative manner is, as has been pointed out to you regularly, unacceptable.
 

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