Where exactly can one get free access to medieval manuscripts?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,748
SoCal
#1
Where exactly can one get free access to medieval manuscripts (ideally, but not necessarily, with an English translation)? I'm curious about this because it would be interesting to see what exactly contemporary sources said about, for instance, the genealogy of French royal family members as well as on various other topics. The genealogy aspect of this is especially interesting; after all, how exactly do we know the birth order of the children of French princes in the Middle Ages? Where exactly was this information first recorded?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,476
Portugal
#2
Where exactly can one get free access to medieval manuscripts (ideally, but not necessarily, with an English translation)? I'm curious about this because it would be interesting to see what exactly contemporary sources said about, for instance, the genealogy of French royal family members as well as on various other topics. The genealogy aspect of this is especially interesting; after all, how exactly do we know the birth order of the children of French princes in the Middle Ages? Where exactly was this information first recorded?
“With an English translation”? That means that they are not the original medieval manuscripts, but later works. That is easy. Some are even online.

About the originals, don’t know about the USA, but in Portugal and Spain while a post graduate student or a master student you can request to see the originals in the archives. If the request is supported by your teacher and relevant to the course of the investigation it is usually granted. Naturally for that you need to know paleography and diplomatics (Diplomatics - Wikipedia) as well as the language in what the document is written. I recall that in my master course we were also invited to visit and research the Vatican Archives.

If you are out of the Academic path is a bit more difficult but not necessarily impossible. Naturally you will have to convince the archives of the necessity of consulting the originals and not just the transcriptions.

EDIT: typo corrected
 
Last edited:
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,748
SoCal
#3
For the record, I was including transcriptions here. What I care about is the text itself--not the age of the paper that this text is written on.
 
May 2017
928
France
#4
In the 70 s, it was possible to study the "precious manuscrits" in the special service of the National Library,Richelieu street.The first level was reserved to the "imprimes",the books,the second level to the collections of the original pieces,coming generally from the "Bibliotheque du Roi".In 1789,the director of the BDR was Bernard Cherin son,successor of Bernard Cherin father.The chief of the "Cabinet des Titres" (documents about the families o the aristocracy) was his lieutnant Berthier de Sauvigny.
But now,the politic of the protection of the documents is so strict that we have only the possibility to ask for reproductions of the documents which are keept in special rooms at adapted températures in the BN services of Bussy Saint Georges:time to wait,one year…....
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,476
Portugal
#5
For the record, I was including transcriptions here. What I care about is the text itself--not the age of the paper that this text is written on.
Sorry, I misunderstood you. Transcriptions are usually much more easy to get (if the manuscript was transcripted, many still aren’t, and some of the 19th century transcriptions have errors, so for a researcher sometimes it is relevant to really see the original document to confirm that the transcription is correct).

So if the manuscript is transcprited and published any major library in a college could or should have it or at least have access to it by library loan.

All the major archives are also making huge efforts to digitalize medieval manuscripts, in the case of Portugal, the Torre do Tombo: Biblioteca ANTT | Arquivo Nacional Torre do Tombo, or projects like Guttemberg or the Archives.org, even if in this cases normally what is available are later documents/transcriptions. For the case that you are asking maybe it is better to wait for the answer of a French user of a user that is used to deal with French archives. I am not used to it: Accueil

EDIT: just saw that dupuydumazeldan posted!
 
Likes: Futurist
May 2017
928
France
#6
When i entered the first time-the day of my 18 years,law s condition-in the service of the manuscrits of the Ancient Regime,in 1978, with Mr Francois Jean Mallein (+ 2001 in Neully),creator of the genealogy bibliothec of Paris,Turbigo street,the organizacion was:
-Original Pieces:
-Blue Collection:
-French Manuscrits:
-D Hozier Collections:
-New D Hozier Collections:
-Carre D Hozier Collections:
-Cherin Collection (the best collection for the aristocracy):
 
Likes: Futurist

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,101
#7
Where exactly can one get free access to medieval manuscripts (ideally, but not necessarily, with an English translation)? I'm curious about this because it would be interesting to see what exactly contemporary sources said about, for instance, the genealogy of French royal family members as well as on various other topics. The genealogy aspect of this is especially interesting; after all, how exactly do we know the birth order of the children of French princes in the Middle Ages? Where exactly was this information first recorded?
Maybe the Medieval Orb website might have links to that sort of stuff somewhere.
 
Likes: Futurist

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,935
Dispargum
#10
Many works that are now out of copyright are available as cheap (99 cents sometimes) or even free e-books. If you know the title or author just search on your e-reader's website, like Amazon.
 
Likes: Futurist

Similar History Discussions