Which Chinese censuses were true and how do we now know?

Mar 2015
858
Europe
#1
In late 1890s, Choson government held a census in Korea... and found under 6 million people.
In 1909, the Japanese protectorate held a new census - and found over 13 million people.

It is not that Koreans bred like rabbits in 10 years. Nor did 7 million foreigners immigrate to Korea.

The general suspicion is that the Choson dynasty censuses were absurd.

In 18th century, the population of China grew suspiciously fast - although gradually.
It is widely suspected that the censuses of late Ming and early Qing were absurd.

Given that late Ming censuses are suspected to have been absurd... are there any earlier censuses which are believed? And why these?
 
Aug 2015
1,850
Los Angeles
#2
This doesn't make sense, you are assuming that late Ming and early Qing census are absurd, therefore is there anything else we should believe.

Except, why do we believe late Ming figures and early Qing figures are absurd?

Are you trying to make us do your homework?
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,749
United States
#3
In late 1890s, Choson government held a census in Korea... and found under 6 million people.
In 1909, the Japanese protectorate held a new census - and found over 13 million people.

It is not that Koreans bred like rabbits in 10 years. Nor did 7 million foreigners immigrate to Korea.

The general suspicion is that the Choson dynasty censuses were absurd.

In 18th century, the population of China grew suspiciously fast - although gradually.
It is widely suspected that the censuses of late Ming and early Qing were absurd.

Given that late Ming censuses are suspected to have been absurd... are there any earlier censuses which are believed? And why these?
Are there other examples of Choson censuses being absurd, or just that one?
 
Apr 2018
29
Los Angeles
#4
Please define "Absurd". In the context that you are posting, I'm guessing you are suggesting the population counts were either too high or too low.

In regards to China's historic censuses, they were usually accurate during peace time. During times of turmoil however, it was prone to severe undercounting. This seems to be the consensus for a lot of modern day scholars.
 

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