Which country made best science/technology contribution?

Status
Closed

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,484
San Antonio, Tx
No. I'm just saying that the British invented the telephone, the television, the computer, the World Wide Web, the lawnmower and the cardiac pacemaker.

Oh, and tarmac. And cats' eyes. And the seed drill. And the clockwork radio. We mustn't forget the pencil. Shorthand is another Great British invention.

We also gave the world DNA fingerprinting, iris recognition, disc brakes, the steam turbine, the internal combustion engine AND the wind tunnel.

Oh yeah, I nearly forgot - the world's first iron bridge, the corkscrew, the Little Nipper Mousetrap, the lightswitch, the postage stamp, the rubber band, the pram, the baby buggy, the maginfying glass, Portland cement and the smallpox vaccine.

And the clinical thermometer. And the typhoid vaccine. And the tank. And the fighter aircraft. And the shrapnel shell. And the Dreadnought Battleship. Amd the concertina. We even invented the Irish flute.

Oh, damn, I nearly forgot that we also invented the tuning fork, and cinematography, thje movie projector, modern atomic theory, calculus, the Faraday cage, the electrical generator, the electromagnet, the weather map, the seismograph, the jet engine, the railways and the hovercraft.

And the lifeboat, and the plimsoll line, and the octant, and we musn't forget the sextant.

We also invented the diving bell, the submarine (the Americans think their Turtle was the first but William Bourne's submarine of 1620 predated it by 155 years) AND, of course, the hydrophone and hydrofoil.

And linoleum. And the crossword puzzle. And the friction match. And carbonated drinks. And plasticene. And Meccano.

We invented the Nature Reserve, too, as well as the Boy Scouts, the YMCA and the modern circus.


Oh, yeah, and comics, too.

And guess, what? Apart from tarmac, all of those were invented by Englishmen. There's still all those other inventions from the Scots and Welsh and the Northern Irish.

It was a Scot, of course, who even invented the United States Navy.
Really? Can a “Navy” be invented?
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,484
San Antonio, Tx
The map of scientific contribution from Murray's book for period 1800-1950 indeed seems to suggest so.

That's why I mentioned Scotland before England here when it comes to 1800-1950:

Which country made best science/technology contribution?

However, in period 1600-1800 it seems that Scotland was still a scientific desert compared to England.

I LOL, have no difficulty whatsoever accepting that the Brits and Scots made some of the greatest advances in science during the last 300 years or so. Give credit where it’s due. Others made great advances as well: good on them.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,484
San Antonio, Tx
Really? Can a “Navy” be invented?
What exactly is the point of responding to a 7 year old post with a questionm when the poster has not been around for years?
Honestly, I have no idea if the poster is or is not around. Am I supposed to know this, and if so, how would I know it? Do these topics and discussions have a time limit and then they expire? If so, why not get rid of the topics?
 
All added to each other. Rome for example, they had a huge amount of achievements and their contribution to the western world cannot possibly be overstated (Seeing as they're the ones who pretty much created what we call ''western civilisation.'') but even they took a lot from the Greeks.

To answer to question, for the nations that still exist: Britain, France and Germany. I have to ask: How ''great'' does an achievement have to be to warrant this thread? Whenever I see ''Who is the best...'' or ''X vs Y, what is better?'' I always wonder what is the criteria by which we should rate.
 
Honestly, I have no idea if the poster is or is not around. Am I supposed to know this, and if so, how would I know it? Do these topics and discussions have a time limit and then they expire? If so, why not get rid of the topics?
It's pretty easy to check: Just click on their profile picture and you will see if they're suspended and the last time they were online. Most people in these older threads have not been around for years and some are permanently suspended. If a thread has been inactive for over a year or in many cases less it is safe to say that most people have left and that the discussion is long since over.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
34,479
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Honestly, I have no idea if the poster is or is not around. Am I supposed to know this, and if so, how would I know it? Do these topics and discussions have a time limit and then they expire? If so, why not get rid of the topics?
Use some common sense.

Have you seen the poster around? Do you think it's likely, after 7 years that they're going to reply?

The least you can do, if you're going to reply to a post that old, is check if the poster is around or not, which you can do by simply viewing their profile. Otherwise, you are wasting everyone's time.
 
Likes: Futurist
Nov 2013
705
Texas
When I object to education for technology replacing liberal education in the US, people assume I don't like technology. Nothing could be further from the truth, but perhaps I am wrong to believe the US was a world leader in science and the industrial revolution. Can you give me a crash course on national leadership in science and technology before 1958?
Greece.

Greece falls apart once you realise the Greeks didn't really do anything the Arabs didn't (like have some cities experience some overrated golden ages, conquer vast swaths of territory, etc.) though the Greeks were probably a lot more innovative than the Arabs

OTOH, Greek contributions weren't really downplable either; so scientists like Aristotle, Archimedes, Aritosthenes, Ptolemy. Greeks were still more important to the humanities than the sciences though.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,926
SoCal
When I object to education for technology replacing liberal education in the US, people assume I don't like technology. Nothing could be further from the truth, but perhaps I am wrong to believe the US was a world leader in science and the industrial revolution. Can you give me a crash course on national leadership in science and technology before 1958?
This book might be of interest to you:

What are your thoughts on Charles Murray's book Human Accomplishment?

You might not agree with its conclusions, but it might nevertheless be worth taking a look at.
 
Status
Closed