Which empire in history do you consider to be the most interesting?

Jan 2017
1,230
Durham
#81
Is it more American thing that they are more into modern history and less into ancient history?
I'd imagine personal rather than national. Plenty of Americans on this board comment on early periods of history. I'm not American, but I have no interest in early periods of history.

It's just a personal thing. I find the 19th century, and the very early 20th century, fascinating because of the complete upheaval in ideas, science and so on. Europe's change during that period was chaos in terms of its speed. That's European centric, but then what's wrong with that.
 
Likes: Futurist
Mar 2016
1,116
Australia
#82
Byzantine Empire - enemy of Christian states? :eek: They were Christian, just Orthodox. That means, just more mystic than in the Western Christianity.
Because of their Orthodox religion - which was viewed with much hostility in the West - they were seen as 'others' by the Catholics of Western and Central Europe. Their religious heresy - in their eyes - was repeatedly brought up by their Christian enemies such as the Normans, the Franks and the Venetians. Not all Christians are automatically friendly just because they sort-of share a religion.
 
Likes: Futurist

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,808
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#83
...For me it's the Byzantine Empire (as much as I prefer not to call it "Byzantine" since it's anachronistic), specifically in the period of the 8th century to the 11th century....They very rarely had any extended periods of peace and stability, being an enemy to both Christian and Muslim states, as well as facing uncountable civil wars and rebellions. While Europe languished in its semi-Dark Age, Byzantium's preservation of knowledge, science and culture was remarkable.

Anyway, that's my pick. What about you guys?
Byzantine Empire - enemy of Christian states? :eek: They were Christian, just Orthodox. That means, just more mystic than in the Western Christianity.
Because of their Orthodox religion - which was viewed with much hostility in the West - they were seen as 'others' by the Catholics of Western and Central Europe. Their religious heresy - in their eyes - was repeatedly brought up by their Christian enemies such as the Normans, the Franks and the Venetians. Not all Christians are automatically friendly just because they sort-of share a religion.
But they had a lot of Christian enemies at various times. Like Sicily, Bulgaria, Serbia, Armenia, Georgia, the crusader states, the Fourth Crusade, the "Latin Empire of Constantinople".
I can add Arian Christian Germanic tribes like Vandals, Ostrogoths, and Lombards, and their Catholic subjects, as sometime enemies of the eastern Roman Empire. I can also add various pagan or heathen groups like Asiatic nomads and pre conversion Slavs as sometime enemies of the eastern Roman empire in addition to various Christian, Muslim, & Zoroastrian groups. And of course the partially Jewish population of the Khazar realm that were sometimes allies and sometimes enemies. The often hostile Zoroastrian majority Sassanid Empire had sizable Jewish, Nestorian Christian, and Buddhist minorities.

Note that the Armenian church considered the eastern Orthodox churches to be heretical, and vice versa, just like the Catholic Church did, but Bulgaria, Serbia, & Georgia were also eastern Orthodox, and were sometimes or often at war with the eastern Roman empire. Just like many Catholic kingdoms and principalities in western Europe often went to war with other Catholic states.
 
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VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,424
Florania
#84
Well I will be super boring and say the British Empire. The culture and people are new enough I can relate to them, while being unusual enough to pique my interest. Also being so new, there is a lot of documentary evidence, journals, diaries etc.
What did I think when I posted a thread called Decline and Fall of the British Empire?
 
Jan 2017
1,230
Durham
#85
Because of their Orthodox religion - which was viewed with much hostility in the West - they were seen as 'others' by the Catholics of Western and Central Europe. Their religious heresy - in their eyes - was repeatedly brought up by their Christian enemies such as the Normans, the Franks and the Venetians. Not all Christians are automatically friendly just because they sort-of share a religion.
Yes, they were arch enemies, for a long time Western Europe was the poor relation - going as far as to ransack Constantinople during at least one of the crusades.