Which group(s) is responsible for spreading the Bubonic/Black Plague across Eurasia?

Jul 2016
3
U.S.
Also which other groups were present a the Siege of Kaffa, 1347 in Crimea besides the Mongols, Tatars, and Genoese; any Chinese, Russians, Etc? The Siege is sometimes regarded one of the first entry points of the plague in Europe, because the retreating Mongol army catapulted dead corpses across Kaffa's wall. Where did the plague originate also not meaning where the first outbreaks occurred.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,990
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
Which group(s) is responsible for spreading the Bubonic/Black Plague across Eurasia?
There as a book that I never read, but I do dimly remember the title of the book. So I guess the correct answer is "Rats, Lice, and Historians".
 
Jun 2015
1,257
Scotland
It was spread by rats, but from what I can tell it was originated in Mongol controlled land.
Bubonic Plague is endemic in some areas of Northern China and Mongolia. I guess it's just waiting until it mutates enough for our immune systems to no longer recognise it and boom, another epidemic.
 
Jul 2016
243
Just outside the Rust Belt
It was spread by rats, but from what I can tell it was originated in Mongol controlled land.
It was spread by fleas who were on rats. They originated somewhere within the Mongol Empire and spread by trade routes to the West where it first entered Italy and then spread outward from there.

If we can blame anyone it would be traders for connecting the multiple civilizations of Europe and East Asia into one once more, or the Mongols. Though it's hard to assign responsibility or blame for a event nobody had any control over.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,727
Dispargum
Around the year 1300 the planet entered a period of global cooling that lasted until about 1900. This had the effect of shortening growing seasons and restricting the food supply. In the years leading up to the Black Death there had been a few, not every, years of famine, at least in Europe. People lost weight and were not as resistant to disease as they had been previously. Another possibility is that because of increased competition for the same food, grain, people and rats may have been living in closer proximity to each other, making it easier for the fleas to pass from rats to people.

Due to the shorter growing seasons and shrinking food supply the higher human populations of the 13th century were no longer sustainable. If the Black Death had never happened, there would have been some other calamity that reduced the human population.