Which historical person would you like to drink a beer with?

Dec 2015
3,700
USA
#53
I would like to meet various people from history,

Sports

Babe Ruth- Widely regarded as the greatest baseball home run hitter...Ruth was also a good starting pitcher the combo of a pitcher/hitter is rare these days with Shohei Ohtani being a good exception. Babe Ruth is known all over the world, having down barnstorming in Japan. Ruth enjoyed Hot dogs and beers. So he is just the guy to have a beer with.

Business

Henry Ford

Doubled the wages of his employees in 1914 from 2.49 to 5 $ an hour..It was historic and made a huge impact on the American middle class. Ford was an American icon...because of Ford my dad, uncle, my friends brother and stepdad and many Americans were set for life with a good job. The Model T was a world renown Automobile. The Model T was a very important automobile in US history, the jobs and benefits the car brought to the USA was immeasurable. It was not just jobs that the Model T created, but because of its affordable nature it helped to grow the middle class in the USA. The Ford Mustang of the 1960s and 1970s is greatly sought after as one of the top American sports cars. The F-150 has been consistently rated as the Top Truck of its size offered worldwide.

Leadership

FDR

FDR is credited with advancing the USA to become the worlds greatest military and economic strength. American Steel and Auto worked with the FDR administration to produce massive amounts of planes, Vehicles and more used to win WW2. And very worthy of this thread, when FDR ended Prohibition in the USA, Roosevelt said I think this would good time for a beer. In the threads spirit, for the man whom ended prohibition in the USA and made it possible to have a beer legally in the USA I say cheers to FDR... Long Live FDR.
 
Nov 2016
888
Germany
#55
The Marquis de Sade
But suppose you meet him and he complains that three quarters of the scripts he wrote in 13 years in prison have been lost because they were left in his cell in the Bastille when he was transferred to another prison, and were destroyed or stolen after the Storming of the Bastille. What would you tell him?
 
Jul 2019
361
New Jersey
#56
But suppose you meet him and he complains that three quarters of the scripts he wrote in 13 years in prison have been lost because they were left in his cell in the Bastille when he was transferred to another prison, and were destroyed or stolen after the Storming of the Bastille. What would you tell him?
In all seriousness, the Marquis de Sade was a truly vicious and evil man. He raped and tortured children and servants freely. The less of what he did or wrote survives, the better off the world is. Considering as he was strictly a sadist, and not a masochist, it might be some poetic justice to do to him what he did to others (whipping, pouring boiling wax into cuts, etc). He is truly a repulsive man.

Ultimately, my mentioning his name was just meant to be a racy joke.
 
Nov 2016
888
Germany
#58
In all seriousness, the Marquis de Sade was a truly vicious and evil man. He raped and tortured children and servants freely. The less of what he did or wrote survives, the better off the world is. Considering as he was strictly a sadist, and not a masochist, it might be some poetic justice to do to him what he did to others (whipping, pouring boiling wax into cuts, etc). He is truly a repulsive man
I largely agree with you, but I think he wasn't as completely evil as you put it. The cruel actions which he practiced in real life are undoubtedly symptoms of a morbid sexual perversion, as they have in even worse form those monsters which are active in the snuff business.

But he was also a free-thinking philosopher who regarded private property, class differences, the family and religion as the causes of the European misery. In the years of the terror regime under Robespierre and Saint-Just, he supported the revolution and served as a judge with a death sentence license, but without ever imposing such a sentence because he was an opponent of the death penalty. In this way he saved lives that another judge in his place would have exterminated. In general, he was a critic of the violence perpetrated by the revolutionaries. He was therefore arrested again and sentenced to death for his alleged anti-revolutionary convictions. Only Robespierre's fall in 1794 prevented the execution and he was released. That he contributed to the improvement of the French health care system in his years as a judge is only marginally noteworthy.

When his "Justine" appeared in 1797, the book caused a scandal and led to De Sade's arrest in 1801. That he denied authorship was of no use to him. He had to spend the rest of his life in a lunatic asylum where he performed plays.
 
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Aug 2019
15
Southwest Florida
#59
Johnny Evers, a bar in Chicago, circa 1907-1908, with the intent of getting drunk and hopefully in a fight; possibly with him, it really doesn't matter so long as we're drunk, and in a fight.

Why?

Ty Cobb, of the Detroit Tigers, over a 24 year career, as a player, was ejected from 15 games; Johnny Evers holds the record for player ejections with 50, over a 16 year career. * It was easier to get along with Ty Cobb than with Johnny Evers.

From Baseball's Sad Lexicon: "From Tinker to Evers to Chance" immortalized the Chicago Cubs' two time World Champion infield/double play combination, Tinker, Evers, and Chance. But Joe Tinker and Johnny Evers had to be assigned separate locker rooms after repeatedly assaulting one another.

Then of course there is the whole Merkle's Boner thing, but that's for another time.

* the second highest total ejections is only 27.

P.S. This is all make believe right; I really can't get beat up? There is one guy on here who (thinks he) wants to drink with Genghis Khan; what kind of time machine rules do we have here, because Chicago at the turn of the century was the 'Black City' (Larson).
 
Feb 2019
417
Thrace
#60
Johnny Evers, a bar in Chicago, circa 1907-1908, with the intent of getting drunk and hopefully in a fight; possibly with him, it really doesn't matter so long as we're drunk, and in a fight.

Why?

Ty Cobb, of the Detroit Tigers, over a 24 year career, as a player, was ejected from 15 games; Johnny Evers holds the record for player ejections with 50, over a 16 year career. * It was easier to get along with Ty Cobb than with Johnny Evers.

From Baseball's Sad Lexicon: "From Tinker to Evers to Chance" immortalized the Chicago Cubs' two time World Champion infield/double play combination, Tinker, Evers, and Chance. But Joe Tinker and Johnny Evers had to be assigned separate locker rooms after repeatedly assaulting one another.

Then of course there is the whole Merkle's Boner thing, but that's for another time.

* the second highest total ejections is only 27.

P.S. This is all make believe right; I really can't get beat up? There is one guy on here who (thinks he) wants to drink with Genghis Khan; what kind of time machine rules do we have here, because Chicago at the turn of the century was the 'Black City' (Larson).
I read this comment in a Jersey accent
 
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