Which languages could have been much more prominent than they are in real life?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#11
Yeah, it is a bit sad because it prevented the spread of French culture. The only place that French people are found in large numbers in North America nowadays is in Quebec (Haitians are French-speaking but not ethnically French). In contrast, you find a lot of English people throughout the US and the rest of Canada and also throughout Australia and New Zealand.
 
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Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,536
US
#12
Yeah, it is a bit sad because it prevented the spread of French culture. The only place that French people are found in large numbers in North America nowadays is in Quebec (Haitians are French-speaking but not ethnically French). In contrast, you find a lot of English people throughout the US and the rest of Canada and also throughout Australia and New Zealand.
And Germans have migrated well. And Italians, Scots, Irish , Poles, Yugoslavs, etc., but few French.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jan 2017
573
UK
#13
Turkish: Prime geographic location to spread across Southern Europe, Middle East & North Africa thanks to the Ottoman Empire, although Arabic's key role in the Quran would've been tough to displace.

Quechua: Had the Incas survived longer they could have spread their influence further across South America.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#15
Turkish: Prime geographic location to spread across Southern Europe, Middle East & North Africa thanks to the Ottoman Empire, although Arabic's key role in the Quran would've been tough to displace.

Quechua: Had the Incas survived longer they could have spread their influence further across South America.
Excellent examples!

I don't know if the Incas were fans of universal literacy, but the entire population of the Ottoman Empire could have learned Turkish once the Ottomans would have tried implementing universal literacy.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#16
Also, I suppose that Hungarian deserves an honorable mention here since a lot more people would probably be speaking Hungarian right now had Hungary kept its 1914 borders up to the present-day.
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
13,497
Europix
#17
That would have required extensive French settler colonialism, no? The French were not known for settler colonialism. (Even in Algeria, it was Italians, Spaniards, and Maltese who appear to have made up the majority of the European settlers there.)
No need for settling: the international use of French never relied on settling. It's enough to look at a map of the countries members of "Organisation internationale de la Francophonie".

English replaced French as Lingua Franca after WWII, and the main reason remains WWII coupled with the fall of France.

The war itself (regardless it's outcome) destroyed (still would had, with a different outcome) economically whole Europe while boosting US economy. Economical success is one of the most important vector for a lingua franca.

The fall of France demolished iremediably the aura of France, thus the aura of the French language.

___________
small trivia, especially for our "whatif futurist", but not only: the most powerful vector of English in the last 20 years remains the www.

France introduced the Minitel, that remaines an "internet before the internet", in the '80s. Without the WWII, it's not to improbable that French would have been the ones at the origin of the www, thus vectoring French language, not English (n the late '80-early '90s, Minitel had a much bigger penetration, a more users than CompuServe, already provided e-mail, instant messagerie, even embryos of social media started to appear)
 
Last edited:

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,536
US
#18
No need for settling: the international use of French never relied on settling. It's enough to look at a map of the countries members of "Organisation internationale de la Francophonie".

English replaced French as Lingua Franca after WWII, and the main reason remains WWII coupled with the fall of France.

The war itself (regardless it's outcome) destroyed (still would had, with a different outcome) economically whole Europe while boosting US economy. Economical success is one of the most important vector for a lingua franca.

The fall of France demolished iremediably the aura of France, thus the aura of the French language.

___________
small trivia, especially for our "whatif futurist", but not only: the most powerful vector of English in the last 20 years remains the www.

France introduced the Minitel, that remaines an "internet before the internet", in the '80s. Without the WWII, it's not to improbable that French would have been the ones at the origin of the www, thus vectoring French language, not English)
Merci.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#19
No need for settling: the international use of French never relied on settling. It's enough to look at a map of the countries members of "Organisation internationale de la Francophonie".
True. France was able to get large numbers of Blacks to speak French even without settling a lot of French people in these territories.

English replaced French as Lingua Franca after WWII, and the main reason remains WWII coupled with the fall of France.

The war itself (regardless it's outcome) destroyed (still would had, with a different outcome) economically whole Europe while boosting US economy. Economical success is one of the most important vector for a lingua franca.

The fall of France demolished iremediably the aura of France, thus the aura of the French language.
All of this might be true, but it is worth noting that France was in decline for 125 years before the Fall of France occurred. Sure, it acquired a huge empire, but its own demographics were terrible relative to those of its neighbors.

___________
small trivia, especially for our "whatif futurist", but not only: the most powerful vector of English in the last 20 years remains the www.

France introduced the Minitel, that remaines an "internet before the internet", in the '80s. Without the WWII, it's not to improbable that French would have been the ones at the origin of the www, thus vectoring French language, not English)
Frankly, I suspect that, in such a scenario, there would have been a huge push to create an English equivalent of the Minitel since much more people speak English than speak French.
 

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