Which militaries throughout History have the most misinformed fanbase?

Mar 2012
4,323
The Japanese would have poured volley fire into the hussars. Nobunaga knew how to deal with cavalry.

You're entitled to your opinion, based as it is on ignorance.
While its incorrect to say Japanese infantry were poor in tactics (their volley rotation, linear formation, and hayago equipped arquebuses were all ahead of their time), its still doubtful that it would have survived the Polish Hussars. Japanese infantry were almost outflanked in the Battle of Jiksan by the Ming cavalry and the Korean arquebusiers modeled on Japan all had problems against Manchu cataphracts. The Polish Hussars were as heavily armed as the heavy Manchu cavalry, probably had even bigger horses and would have little trouble breaking an infantry formation even if it was much bigger in number.
 
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Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
32,491
T'Republic of Yorkshire
While its incorrect to say Japanese infantry were poor in tactics (their volley rotation, linear formation, and hayago equipped arquebuses were all ahead of their time), its still doubtful that it would have survived the Polish Hussars. Japanese infantry were almost outflanked in the Battle of Jiksan by the Ming cavalry and the Korean arquebusiers modeled on Japan all had problems against Manchu cataphracts. The Polish Hussars were as heavily armed as the heavy Manchu cavalry, probably had even bigger horses and would have little trouble breaking an infantry formation even if it was much bigger in number.
Too many variables to consider. Terrain, weather, numbers, experience, entrenchment etc. When Nobunaga broke the Takeda cavalry charge. jos men had prepared positions and the advantage of terrain.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
32,491
T'Republic of Yorkshire
That's certainly the case in massed formation. Ive seen the polearms used by the Japanese when I visited Okazaki castle. Certainly nasty pieces of work. However, the samurai loved the close with their opponents and engage in melee combat whenever they had the opportunity to do so, as taking ears and heads was considered the only way to verify defeated opponents. There was a Korean general who was decapitated in single combat during the imjin war, and Korean soldiers generally feared Japanese swordsmanship
That;s true up to a point, but the samurai still generally dispatched their opponents with the spear and then drew their sword or dagger to decapitate them. Some of the most famous warriors of the Sengoku period were known for their spear skills, not their swordsmanship, such as Honda Tadakatsu, Kato Kiyomasa and Hattori Hanzo.

The seven bravest warriors in a battle were given the title of the "Seven Spears", the most famous beinf the Seven Soears of Shizugatake. The era of sword worship didn't happen until the Edo period, when the country was largely at peace and individual warriors had time to practise their one on one combat skills.
 

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