Which Military leader was the best fighter?

Mar 2009
73
Many leaders actually fought for their countries, as opposed to the leaders of today.

Great warriors who were also kings or emperors of their nations:

Alexander the great
Genghis Khan
Napolean
Hitler(fought in WW 1)

Who else? And who would you say was the greatest warrior?
 
Mar 2009
2,499
Hitler a warrior?He was not a leader during ww1,just a meassage soldier boy.
And Hitler in ww2 when in power, got other members in his group to to the dirty work,too kill.

But i agree with the three other ones 100%.
 
Mar 2009
73
I konw alot of ppl hate Hitler and what he did. I also dont condone his actions. But I WILL respect the man. And he wasnt just some soldier boy. He earned a purple star(I think thats the name). He was a good soldier.
 

tjadams

Ad Honoris
Mar 2009
25,362
Texas
I konw alot of ppl hate Hitler and what he did. I also dont condone his actions. But I WILL respect the man. And he wasnt just some soldier boy. He earned a purple star(I think thats the name). He was a good soldier.
Never in my life would I remotely have ever given a thought to defending Hitler on much of anything, but: he falls into the category of warrior. Warrior could be defined as anyone belonging to the military of their country, i. e. the National Guard, militia, rear supply or even medical support.
~Hitler paid his dues by having a dangerous job, being in at least four major battles & winning the Iron Cross 1st & 2nd class. I think its fine that he's listed as a warrior for his country.

I'll vote Napoleon.
 
Jan 2009
1,098
Halifax, NS
Caesar was also not a stranger to grabbing a sword and shield and fighting alongside his men. In most cases, Caesar stayed back, behind the lines, thus making it easier to direct operations over the entire battlefield, because once you join in the fighting, you basically lose your ability to influence the battle in any other area besides the vicinity directly around you. There are a few noted cases though where Caesar's men looked like they were beginning to waver, and were in need of a major confidence boost, and at this point, Caesar joined in the battle alongside them.
Incidents like this occurred in the Battle of Munda, and in his battle against the Nervii tribe. I'm fairly certain there were 1 or 2 other examples as well.
 

Nick

Historum Emeritas
Jul 2006
6,111
UK
Churchill fought in the Boer War and WW1
Goring was a flying ace
Mussolini was a soldier in WW1
De Gaulle led the Free French
Stalin and Trotsky fought in the Russian Civil War
George IV was at Waterloo
The Duke of Wellington served as Prime Minister
Many pre-1700 monarchs led their armies into battle
 

DIVUS IVLIVS

Ad Honoris
Jan 2008
18,740
Virginia
Caesar was also not a stranger to grabbing a sword and shield and fighting alongside his men. In most cases, Caesar stayed back, behind the lines, thus making it easier to direct operations over the entire battlefield, because once you join in the fighting, you basically lose your ability to influence the battle in any other area besides the vicinity directly around you. There are a few noted cases though where Caesar's men looked like they were beginning to waver, and were in need of a major confidence boost, and at this point, Caesar joined in the battle alongside them.
Incidents like this occurred in the Battle of Munda, and in his battle against the Nervii tribe. I'm fairly certain there were 1 or 2 other examples as well.
Quite a few more than that, I think.

Caesar fought in the front line for quite a few of his major battles, I think, the thing is that he had an uncanny knack for knowing when he needed to disengage himself and get to a new trouble-spot or fall back to give directions. It's hard to say, as his style of writing in his accounts of the battles is actually designed to put as little emphasis on his own actions as possible. But he certainly lead the front line in charges at the battles against the Helvetii, Ariovistus, the Nervii, at Alesia (it was his famous infantry charge against a detachment of the Gauls while his cavalry attacked them from the rear that one the battle), at Dyracchium, in Alexandria, possibly at Zela, at Ruspina, at Thapsus (where he charged his horse straight into the front ranks of the enemy and fought it out for the entire battle), and as mentioned, his most notable personal stand was at Munda, where he managed to single-handedly turn the tide of the battle by his near-suicidal charge into the enemy ranks (it was fter this battle that he commented that while he had fought many times for victory, this was the first time he had fought for his life).

Those are the ones we know for sure he fought in, and he may well have engaged in others.

Also to be considered should be his career before he was a general: he won the Civic Crown for his heroism at the siege of Mytiline, beat off an attack by one of Mithridates' liuteneants when the former invaded Greece, and may have fought in the war against Spartacus.

Also, in additon to Caesar apparently having fought in many enagements, there something else to be mentioned that I think might well put him in the running for the title of "best fighter": while all of the beings mentioned in this thread certainly fought, how many of them have been labelled as definitely better fighters than the men they commanded? Caesar was described by many as a "master swordsman and rider" - he trained his own gladiators in swordsmanship, and said Gladiators were famous for the skills they later displayed. In his later campaigns when Caesar's veterans were mostly gone and he was forced to relly increasingly on new recruits, it was he who personally trained them in everything from sword skills, to wielding their javelins, to forming formations and marching, as well as even being handy with tips on how to take down elephants! He was spoken of as "domainating the battlefield as a greater fighter than any present on either side".

Probably the only other nominee brought up here who can match this is Alexander the Great.
 

DIVUS IVLIVS

Ad Honoris
Jan 2008
18,740
Virginia
And just for the heck of it, I'll throw in the name of Tokugawa Ieyasu, because we really need some non-western names.

Glad to see we have Genghis Khan too.
 
Mar 2009
2,499
How about John F Kennedy (JFK).He was a soldier in the Vietam war or was it ww2? I can't actually remember!