Which modern city is the oldest?

Aug 2007
2
Yorkshire - England
Damascus, in modern-day Syria is the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world and was settled as early as 8000BC to 10,000 BC. This has been proven by the carbon dating of acheological finds there.

Most scholars agree upon this, yet this is not to be confused with the oldest city, and the two should be considered quite seperately. Older cities are known, yet people are no longer living there. Therefore, I too would opt for Damascus.
 

Edgewaters

Ad Honorem
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
Habitation back to an early date is nothing ... there were, I'm sure, people living where London and Rome (not to mention many, many others) are now for a very, very, very long time. Still it doesn't mean they are the oldest cities.

The thing is which of these places have been cities the longest. Wherever it is, it is almost certainly in the Middle East and most probably in Syria, Iraq, or Iran. I'd be putting my money on Susa. I'd almost consider Damascus, except that it doesn't seem to have been a city for all of the time it's been inhabited.
 
Oct 2007
48
North Wales
Mesopotamia??? This was the first civilization. Civilization meaning the first people to have a written language and develop a system of law and order!
 
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Apr 2008
1
The most ancient constantly inhabited cities on the planet is a title contested by Byblos (Jebail) in Lebanon (eponym of the Bible), Damascus in Syria and Jericho in West Bank/Israel. But Jericho has not been continuously inhabited -- indeed, it had lain in ruins for a couple of generations at the time Joshua is alleged to have passed by. But its walls are said to be seven thousand years old.

Of the cities you named, Baghdad is quite recent -- founded in the 7th century A.D. Rome dates officially from the 8th century B.C. but earlier remains have been found on some of its hills. London is a Roman city of the first century A.D. Istanbul was founded, as Byzantion, a colony of Megara, in the seventh century B.C., refounded as Constantinople (or New Rome) in the fourth century A.D. Jerusalem was an Egyptian subject state in the 14th century B.C., but the present Old City was built by the Emperor Hadrian in the second century A.D. after razing the entire ancient "city of David" and expelling all Jews from the province.
 
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Edgewaters

Ad Honorem
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
London is a Roman city of the first century A.D.
The oldest city in England is uncontested - it is Camulodunum (Colchester).


Jerusalem was an Egyptian subject state in the 14th century B.C., but the present Old City was built by the Emperor Hadrian in the second century A.D. after razing the entire ancient "city of David" and expelling all Jews from the province.
Jerusalem probably wasn't a "city" until at least Solomon's time. It appears to have been an insignifigant site prior to that, more of a seasonal campground with some permanent habitation (recall that ancient Hebrews before this time were nomadic pastoralists, not a settled agrarian peoples).
 
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May 2008
177
Slovakia
Nicomedia was founded in the 3rd century BCE.
Constantinopole in 330AD by Constantinus Magnus.
London by Romans in 43AD.
Rome by Romulus in 753BCE (according to the legend)
...
I don't know exactly when Jerusalem was founded, but it existed already in the time of David and Solomon, which predates all the aforementioned.