Which other countries could have realistically permanently become Protestant?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#1
In addition to all of the countries that became Protestant in real life as a result of the Reformation, which other countries could have realistically permanently become Protestant? Also, how exactly would you have made these countries permanently Protestant and what would the effects of this have been for both the relevant countries and the rest of their neighborhood and world?
 
Apr 2017
1,237
U.S.A.
#3
Belgium and Luxembourg if spain lost them in the 80 years war.
Hungary and Slovakia if the Hapsburg recovery was delayed till later.
Ireland if England made a larger assimilation campaign or was assimilated by the Vikings.
France maybe if religion didn't become associated with loyalty (and all its colonies).
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#4
Belgium and Luxembourg if spain lost them in the 80 years war.
Hungary and Slovakia if the Hapsburg recovery was delayed till later.
Ireland if England made a larger assimilation campaign or was assimilated by the Vikings.
France maybe if religion didn't become associated with loyalty (and all its colonies).
What about the Czechs?
 
Apr 2017
1,237
U.S.A.
#5
The Czechs weren't really pro-protestant, more hussite (similar but different). They were also suppressed by the Austrians, for them to stand a chance Austria would have either had to become Protestant or lost control of Bohemia-Moravia.
 
Likes: Futurist

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,471
Sydney
#6
Poland had many protestants ,in the mid 16th century about half of the great nobles and a quarter of the lesser ones were protestants
Poland uniquely stood as an haven of tolerance , since the Church had been stripped of it's judicial powers in 1563
the Catholic church slowly regaining its importance by evangelical persuasion only
it was mightily helped by theological dispute among the protestants themselves and the splitting in many branches and sects
the Bible of Brest was written in Polish , as in other places this was a strong impetus to the growth of local literature
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#7
The Czechs weren't really pro-protestant, more hussite (similar but different). They were also suppressed by the Austrians, for them to stand a chance Austria would have either had to become Protestant or lost control of Bohemia-Moravia.
Was there any chance of getting the Czechs to label the Hussite Church as Protestant?

Poland had many protestants ,in the mid 16th century about half of the great nobles and a quarter of the lesser ones were protestants
Poland uniquely stood as an haven of tolerance , since the Church had been stripped of it's judicial powers in 1563
the Catholic church slowly regaining its importance by evangelical persuasion only
it was mightily helped by theological dispute among the protestants themselves and the splitting in many branches and sects
the Bible of Brest was written in Polish , as in other places this was a strong impetus to the growth of local literature
How strong was Ukrainian and Belarusian literature before the 19th century?
 
Apr 2017
1,237
U.S.A.
#10
What about if Prussia will liberate the Czechs from Austrian rule in 1866 and then aggressively promote the idea of mass Czech conversions to the Hussite Church?
By 1866 Religion wasn't as flexible or as important as it was in the 16th century. The Hussite church was also like a national religion for the Czechs, Germany would prefer Catholicism instead as it would foster less independence.
 
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