Which war is more interesting to study from a military and historical standpoint: the American Civil War or World War I?

More interesting War to study?

  • WW1

    Votes: 18 69.2%
  • American Civil War

    Votes: 8 30.8%

  • Total voters
    26
Nov 2019
350
United States
It's interesting to note here that the English Civil War actually had a higher percentile of the total population of Britain dying than possibly any other war Britain, or perhaps more accurately; England ever experienced. The English Civil War cost 3.7% total deaths in the population at that time.
 
Nov 2019
350
United States
Which of course raises the issue of the questioning what was the Global Impact of the Black Plague, expressly for Western Europe during the 14th Century. I personally owe a great deal of debt to Barbara Tuchman for her book "A Distant Mirror" for making me consider the import of that event from an economic and social point of view that I had never quite considered. From the middle to the end of the 14th century, Europe in the short span of 1348–1350 wiped out fully one-third of the population. The impact was that society was forced to change in many ways not acknowledged easily, disconnecting the relationship often between serfs and artisans, and the squires, dukes, barons and other Court apparatus of that era.

In some areas of France 70% of the population died, leaving huge swaths of land uncultivated for a generation.
 
Sep 2015
430
The Eastern Hinterlands
Which war do you find more interesting to study and why?
The American Civil War, no question about it. In terms of military history and historical significance it's the greatest civil war in history. World War I is fascinating but not as multifaceted and as interesting as other greater conflicts.
 
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Jun 2015
1,310
Scotland
The American Civil War, no question about it. In terms of military history and historical significance it's the greatest civil war in history. World War I is fascinating but not as multifaceted and as interesting as other greater conflicts.
Greatest? 100 Years War, sevaral Roman Civil Wars, Chinese Civil War 1927-1950?
 
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Nov 2019
350
United States
Greatest? 100 Years War, sevaral Roman Civil Wars, Chinese Civil War 1927-1950?
Giving you the caveat of the Roman Civil Wars, and Chinese Civil War, I have a hard time seeing the 100 Years War as a "Civil War". Maybe your typical type of war of succession so popular with Europe, or perchance just your average piquant inter-married royal squabble that results in some population that a benighted/besotted king despoils, but not a "Civil War", in either the sense of the ACW or the Chinese Civil War, or for that matter the average Roman Civil War.

Moreso that despite the fact that I think the era is rife with interesting stories, the 100 years war was anything but a contiguous affair. Mostly it was generally some brigand group or another rampaging from one end of France or Italy to the other, robbing and pillaging, or becoming a mercenary for whatever side managed to supply funds. There was no vast overarching issue that had meaning to the actual citizens of France or England, who mostly just wanted to be left alone, and not robbed or pillaged. Here is a timeline of the actual battles of the 100 years with an annotation showing the intervals between battles which were as large as 40 years. The result meaning that in the end there was only battles fought during 11.3 out of the 116 years of the "100 Years War". What there was mostly was brigandage, and disease; the Black Plague.

battles of the 100 years war.png
 
Dec 2014
493
Wales
Greatest civil war - if we are talking scale and casualties - is without question the Taiping rebellion.
Most historically significant - probably Russian rebellion, bearing in mind the effect of soviet communism on the globe in the 20th century.
 
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Nov 2019
350
United States
Greatest civil war - if we are talking scale and casualties - is without question the Taiping rebellion.
Most historically significant - probably Russian rebellion, bearing in mind the effect of soviet communism on the globe in the 20th century.
Though of course in the end the entire precept of the Russian Revolution, as it denigrated to Bolshevism, was a failure. The American Revolution conversely is an ongoing experiment with working results, creating the largest economy, and longest existing Constitutional Republic in the world. (Alright caveat to San Marino).
 
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Sep 2014
1,000
Texas
But I am an American whose ancestors fought in the Civil War. People in Europe and Asia would not find it interesting. American history is only interesting if you can make a connection to it.
 
Dec 2014
493
Wales
Though of course in the end the entire precept of the Russian Revolution, as it denigrated to Bolshevism, was a failure. The American Revolution conversely is an ongoing experiment with working results, creating the largest economy, and longest existing Constitutional Republic in the world. (Alright caveat to San Marino).
But even that failure is historical - one of the most significant events of the second half of the twentieth century was the collapse of the Soviet Union. How profound a historical event was the destruction of the Berlin Wall or the end of the Warsaw Pact and the democratisation of Eastern Europe? How many wars in the second half of the century were proxy wars between East and West, or battles against the spread of communism? How much of American history was shaped by it's reaction to the Soviet Union and the Cold War? Being forced to give up any thoughts of isolationism, McCarthyism, the nuclear threat, Korea, Vietnam.....

In turn the Russian Federation today and the way it acts can only be looked at with an eye on the history of the USSR. Even it's existence is due to the removal of the Tsar by the revolution - I agree in all probability he probably wouldn't have lasted out WW1 (and we are back to the original question here), but who knows what Russia would be if the original provisional government had retained power? A constitutional Monarchy? Some type of democracy even?

The importance of the creation of America on the world is a given, but in barely a century the Russian revolution reshaped first Europe, and then the world, and even today we are still living with it's consequences.
 
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