Which war is more interesting to study from a military and historical standpoint: the American Civil War or World War I?

More interesting War to study?

  • WW1

    Votes: 18 69.2%
  • American Civil War

    Votes: 8 30.8%

  • Total voters
    26
Nov 2019
334
United States
But even that failure is historical - one of the most significant events of the second half of the twentieth century was the collapse of the Soviet Union. How profound a historical event was the destruction of the Berlin Wall or the end of the Warsaw Pact and the democratisation of Eastern Europe? How many wars in the second half of the century were proxy wars between East and West, or battles against the spread of communism? How much of American history was shaped by it's reaction to the Soviet Union and the Cold War? Being forced to give up any thoughts of isolationism, McCarthyism, the nuclear threat, Korea, Vietnam.....

In turn the Russian Federation today and the way it acts can only be looked at with an eye on the history of the USSR. Even it's existence is due to the removal of the Tsar by the revolution - I agree in all probability he probably wouldn't have lasted out WW1 (and we are back to the original question here), but who knows what Russia would be if the original provisional government had retained power? A constitutional Monarchy? Some type of democracy even?

The importance of the creation of America on the world is a given, but in barely a century the Russian revolution reshaped first Europe, and then the world, and even today we are still living with it's consequences.
Cymru am byth! Chean!! Am an American of very mixed nationalities, proud of the Welsh part, on my sports blogs I use the Welsh Dragon as my icon. Love to spend more time on the River Wye (Afon Gwy), we spent about half a week there and plan to return as soon as my wife retires. We even talked about renting a house there for 6 months.
 
Dec 2017
357
Florida
I figuratively roll my eyes whenever someone talks about the Civil War. :zany: It's just something that is over-analyzed and the works about it go on and on and on and on. Plus I am a little perturbed about all romanticism of that time period. World War I, much more exciting.
 
Nov 2019
334
United States
I figuratively roll my eyes whenever someone talks about the Civil War. :zany: It's just something that is over-analyzed and the works about it go on and on and on and on. Plus I am a little perturbed about all romanticism of that time period. World War I, much more exciting.
I've read more books about WW1 than any other subject I've read about. I studied the Russian Revolution very much in depth. Own books on virtually every individual Western campaign, excluding many on the Middle East (though I've read and own three on Galliopoli). Actually have one that I found quite interesting about the War in Eastern Africa. I've done lectures on WW1, and I guess I am ready to move on ... maybe ... until I find the next book that is something I haven't read about .... probably the Middle East. Did read a good book on Kut. Probably ought to read more about the Caucauses, Serbian and Macedonian campaigns. So I am not saying I'm obsessed with it, but maybe I am. I'll be happy when I know everything there is to know (tautologically impossible).

My Civil War interest is funded by interest in Lincoln initially, but as I grew older, and discovered more about my own family history, and that of my wife's family, my interest spread. We went to Vicksburg together, and discovered both our family's history there. My family fought in the Illinois divisions, my wife's family was from Texas, and her Great-Great-Grandfather was the Commander of Moore's Brigade; General John Creed Moore. There was is a bust of him at the National Battlefield Memorial at Vicksburg.

It's intriguing when you realize that both of our families were on opposite sides of that field of battle, even more interesting when we discovered that her father's family fought in the same division that my family fought with from Illinois. I have actually found one of my own Great-Great-Grandfather's record from his recovery from wounds at Antietam.
 
Last edited:

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,964
Republika Srpska
It's interesting to note here that the English Civil War actually had a higher percentile of the total population of Britain dying than possibly any other war Britain, or perhaps more accurately; England ever experienced. The English Civil War cost 3.7% total deaths in the population at that time.
Yeah, that sounds about right. Wars of the Roses maybe come close, I don't really know but they had some bloody battles like Towton.
 
Dec 2014
488
Wales
Cymru am byth! Chean!! Am an American of very mixed nationalities, proud of the Welsh part, on my sports blogs I use the Welsh Dragon as my icon. Love to spend more time on the River Wye (Afon Gwy), we spent about half a week there and plan to return as soon as my wife retires. We even talked about renting a house there for 6 months.
Thanks :) I live near the Wye, and it is beautiful countryside.
 

Zip

Jan 2018
766
San Antonio
My Civil War interest is funded by interest in Lincoln initially, but as I grew older, and discovered more about my own family history, and that of my wife's family, my interest spread. We went to Vicksburg together, and discovered both our family's history there. My family fought in the Illinois divisions, my wife's family was from Texas, and her Great-Great-Grandfather was the Commander of Moore's Brigade; General John Creed Moore. There was is a bust of him at the National Battlefield Memorial at Vicksburg.
The Illinois monument at Vicksburg is most impressive. Inside are the names of over 36,000 Illinoisans who fought at Vicksburg; to some extent the ever victorious Army of the Tennessee was the Illinois Army.

D85947C4-7BB3-4758-9B71-2C01E821C7A8.jpeg
 

Zip

Jan 2018
766
San Antonio
Photos of men of the 7th Illinois infantry, 15th Corps, Army of the Tennessee. Note the Henry repeating rifles and the casual, far from uniform appearance in the field--various slouch hats, lace up brogan shoes and pull on "mule ear" boots, frock coats, shell jackets and fatique blouses. The Western Yankees. The Midwestern men of the Army of the Tennessee and Army of the Cumberland marched and fought in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia and the Carolinas. Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Vicksburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Atlanta, the marches to the Sea and through the Carolinas.

The Easterners of the Army of the Potomac got the publicity, the Midwesterners of the Armies of the Tennessee and Cumberland crushed the rebellion.

FB7EC10F-008C-4A83-B18F-02ADC8C01D80.jpeg83D303AF-8B55-4A02-8AB3-B31F94DACD5A.jpeg
 
Nov 2019
334
United States
The Illinois monument at Vicksburg is most impressive. Inside are the names of over 36,000 Illinoisans who fought at Vicksburg; to some extent the ever victorious Army of the Tennessee was the Illinois Army.

View attachment 26281
Yep been there!! In fact we lived for a number of years just north of Jackson, Miss., so it was just a short drive. The whole battlefield is a great place to visit. It is no surprise that when Ken Burns did his magnificent documentary he started the series right there at Vicksburg.

FYI be careful what you say, Iowans and Ohioans might be listening!
 
Last edited: