Which was a bigger blow to the British navy: the sinking of HMS Hood (WW2) or the sinking of HMS Sheffield (Falklands War)?

Bigger British Naval loss?

  • Sinking of HMS Hood

    Votes: 20 76.9%
  • Sinking of HMS Sheffield

    Votes: 6 23.1%

  • Total voters
    26

GogLais

Ad Honorem
Sep 2013
5,321
Wirral
#2
I’m old enough to remember the loss of the Sheffield but not the Hood. Without any research my thought is that the loss of the Hood was a greater shock to public opinion but the Sheffield was a greater loss as a proportion of the RN’s resources.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,933
Dispargum
#3
Sheffield was lost aprx two days after the Brits sank the General Belgrano so Sheffield only evened the score. Hood sank before Bismarck so was seen as a defeat, a falling behind in the naval war. Sinking Bismarck evened the score.
 
Last edited:
Likes: Edratman

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,175
Welsh Marches
#5
I remember the announcement of the loss of HMS Sheffield, as delivered in gloomy slow motion (which might have been designed to induce a sinking feeling) by the extraordinary spokesman as the Ministry of Defence:


It would have been more serious if more ships had been sunk, the margin was very tight.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2017
2,881
Connecticut
#9
Going with notgivenaway's answer neither. If anything the Hood's sinking motivated the British to take out the Bismarck several days later. Hood was a worse symbolic blow(largest ship in the history of the RN, that was quite good looking as far as ships go) in a conflict with a (then) less obvious conclusion.
 
Feb 2016
4,343
Japan
#10
Hood easily.
More men, bigger ship, had immediate implications on conditions. It was lost in a massive impressive explosion caused the ship to sink in 3 minutes. Hood’s loss was important as to warrant PM giving explicit instructions to hunt down its nemesis.

The Falklands was a one sided steam roll, and the loss of the Sheffield had very little effect on its course. It didn’t sink immediately... it took 5-6 days to sink, the British having time to evacuate survivors and salvage equipment...
 

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