Who are the Anglo Saxons

Aug 2011
1,610
Sweden
It is difficult for me to give some more useful information regarding Hengist et al at all. But I have always thought that the name reminds of other Norse names such as Gudgest etc. But perhaps these are not related at all.

Eomaer was the son of Angeltheow which indeed points to the Angles. I have never found any information of where the Angles had their HQ before leaving for Britain (and the reasons for this migration).
 
Nov 2008
1,220
England
It is difficult for me to give some more useful information regarding Hengist et al at all. But I have always thought that the name reminds of other Norse names such as Gudgest etc. But perhaps these are not related at all.

Eomaer was the son of Angeltheow which indeed points to the Angles. I have never found any information of where the Angles had their HQ before leaving for Britain (and the reasons for this migration).
The Mercian royal family, the Iclingas, claimed descent from Offa, the semi-legendary King Offa of Angeln who it is said flourished in the late fourth to early fifth centuries. His father`s name , Wermund, was certainly known in eighth century England, being the name of a bishop of Rochester. In its cognate form, Gurmund, it was used by Guthrum the enemy of Alfred the Great. Obviously, there was a strong cultural link between Anglo-Saxon England and Scandinavia.
 
Aug 2011
1,610
Sweden
The Mercian royal family, the Iclingas, claimed descent from Offa, the semi-legendary King Offa of Angeln who it is said flourished in the late fourth to early fifth centuries. His father`s name , Wermund, was certainly known in eighth century England, being the name of a bishop of Rochester. In its cognate form, Gurmund, it was used by Guthrum the enemy of Alfred the Great. Obviously, there was a strong cultural link between Anglo-Saxon England and Scandinavia.
Is Guthrum not connected to Guttorm?
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,952
Haio Zimmermann suggests that Britain's favourite conditions for rearing cattle may have been a factor. Enough biomass grows in winter for most of it to allow the cattle to graze. Where cattle can be outwintered for most of the year, farmers canconcentrate on production of food for humans and not have to spend too much time growing winter fodder for the livestock. It's a more productive system. Germanic auxilliaries in service with Rome will have brought back tales of good land, a lack of central authority and abandonned villas. Many estates had been managed for their owners in Rome and, with a collapse of the currency, villas were abandonned. The estate workers were not farmers and appear to have gone to the crumbling cities for protection. They were also preyed upton by scotting and irish slave traders.


Zimmermann, W. H. 1999: Favourable conditions for cattle farming, one reason for the Anglo-Saxon migration over the North Sea? About the Byre‘s evolution in the area south and east of the North Sea and England. In: H. Sarfatij e. a., In discussion with the past. W. A. van Es Festschrift, Amersfoort.
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
4,952
I have never found any information of where the Angles had their HQ before leaving for Britain (and the reasons for this migration).
This is Othere's account told to Alfred. Othere was from the Lofoten Islands. He sailed to the white sea and then later into Denmark.

"Then this country continues until he comes to Sciringesheal, and Norway all the way on the port side. To the south of Sciringesheal a very great sea extends up into the land; it is broader than any man can see across. And Jutland is opposite on one side, and then Zealand. The sea extends many hundred miles up into the land.

And from Sciringesheal, he said that he sailed in five days to the trading-town which they call Hedeby; this stands between the Wends and the Saxons and the Angles, and belongs to the Danes. When he sailed there from Sciringesheal, then Denmark was to the port and open sea to the starboard for three days; and then for two days before he came to Hedeby there lay to his starboard, Jutland, and Zealand and many islands. The Angles dwelt in those lands before they came here to this country. And for those two days there lay to his port those islands which belong to Denmark."


Bede mentions Angeln earlier in his Ecclesiastical History of the English Speaking Peoples and the very early, distinctly anglian, cremation urns in places like Goodmanham, Sancton, Londesbrough etc have their 'closest parallels with those from Angeln and on the island of Fyn', according to JNL Myres. Later pottery is classed as Nordseemischgruppe or mixed north sea style.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,598
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
According to legend the Angles came from the land of the Angles, the Saxons came from the land of the Saxons, and the Jutes came from the land of the Jutes.:):lol:

The land of the Angles was and is identified with the peninsula of Anglia or Angeln or Angel, a small peninsula that is part of the larger peninsula of Jutland. But the Angles probably also lived in neighboring parts of Jutland and Germany.

from the Angles, that is, the country which is called Anglia, and which is said, from that time, to remain desert to this day, between the provinces of the Jutes and the Saxons, are descended the East Angles, the Midland Angles, Mercians, all the race of the Northumbrians, that is, of those nations that dwell on the north side of the River Humber, and the other nations of the English.
Anglia (peninsula) - Wikipedia

The land of the Saxons, or Saxony, was what would now be called northwestern Germany, which was occupied by the original small tribe called the Saxons and by a later large group of tribes named the Saxons after the original Saxons.

The history of Saxony consists of what was originally a small tribe living on the North Sea between the Elbe and Eider River in the present Holstein. The name of this tribe, the Saxons (Latin: Saxones), was first mentioned by the Greek author Ptolemy. The name Saxonsis derived from the Seax, a knife used by the tribe as a weapon.[citation needed]

In 3rd and 4th century Germany, great tribal confederations of the Alamanni, Bavarians, Thuringians, Franks, Frisii, and Saxons arose. These took the place of the numerous petty tribes with their popular tribal form of government. With the exceptions of the Saxons, all these confederations were ruled by kings; the Saxons were divided into a number of independent bodies under different chiefs, and in time of war these chieftains drew lots. The selected leader was followed by the other chiefs until the war ended.[1]

In the 3rd and 4th centuries, the Saxons fought their way victoriously towards the west, and their name was given to the great tribal confederation that stretched towards the west exactly to the former boundary of the Roman Empire, consequently almost to the Rhine. Only a small strip of land on the right bank of the Rhine remained to the Frankish tribe. Towards the south the Saxons pushed as far as the Harz Mountains and the Eichsfeld, and in the succeeding centuries absorbed the greater part of Thuringia. In the east their power extended at first as far as the Elbe and Saale Rivers; in the later centuries it certainly extended much farther. All the coast of the German Ocean belonged to the Saxons except that west of the Weser, which the Frisians retained.
History of Saxony - Wikipedia

So in the 5th and 6th centuries when various groups of Saxons came to Britain, Saxony, the area they could have come from, was a very large region of northwestern Germany. Just as the area of Anglis or Angeln seems too small to have been the only place where the Angles came from, Saxony seems to large for the Saxons to have come from every part of Saxony. More likely the Saxon groups who came from Saxony to Britain cam fromvarious small specific parts of Saxony, though I don't have much idea where those parts of Saxony were.

The land of the Jutes was the Jutland peninsula. The Jutes who migrated to Biritain in the 5th and 6th centuries came from Jutland. I find it rather hard to believe that the Jutes lived in all of the Jutland peninsular except for the tiny area of Anglia. It seems more probable that the Angles lived on parts of the Jutland peninisula near to Anglia so that the areas the Angles and the Jutes occupied were a bit more equal in size.

Another Germanic group that came to Britain were some of the Frisians. The Frisians came from Friesland or Frisia, of course.

Frisia is a long and rather narrow area along the North Sea coast, stretching from the Netherlands to Germany and including some western parts of the Jutland Peninsula. The area that the Frisians who settled in Britain came from may have been much smaller, since the Frisians settled most of Frisia during the Migration Period.
 
Nov 2008
1,220
England
According to legend the Angles came from the land of the Angles, the Saxons came from the land of the Saxons, and the Jutes came from the land of the Jutes.:):lol:

The land of the Angles was and is identified with the peninsula of Anglia or Angeln or Angel, a small peninsula that is part of the larger peninsula of Jutland. But the Angles probably also lived in neighboring parts of Jutland and Germany.


Anglia (peninsula) - Wikipedia

The land of the Saxons, or Saxony, was what would now be called northwestern Germany, which was occupied by the original small tribe called the Saxons and by a later large group of tribes named the Saxons after the original Saxons.



History of Saxony - Wikipedia

So in the 5th and 6th centuries when various groups of Saxons came to Britain, Saxony, the area they could have come from, was a very large region of northwestern Germany. Just as the area of Anglis or Angeln seems too small to have been the only place where the Angles came from, Saxony seems to large for the Saxons to have come from every part of Saxony. More likely the Saxon groups who came from Saxony to Britain cam fromvarious small specific parts of Saxony, though I don't have much idea where those parts of Saxony were.

The land of the Jutes was the Jutland peninsula. The Jutes who migrated to Biritain in the 5th and 6th centuries came from Jutland. I find it rather hard to believe that the Jutes lived in all of the Jutland peninsular except for the tiny area of Anglia. It seems more probable that the Angles lived on parts of the Jutland peninisula near to Anglia so that the areas the Angles and the Jutes occupied were a bit more equal in size.

Another Germanic group that came to Britain were some of the Frisians. The Frisians came from Friesland or Frisia, of course.

Frisia is a long and rather narrow area along the North Sea coast, stretching from the Netherlands to Germany and including some western parts of the Jutland Peninsula. The area that the Frisians who settled in Britain came from may have been much smaller, since the Frisians settled most of Frisia during the Migration Period.
Some historians and archaeologists believe these Frisians were actually Jutish colonists, or a mixture of Angles and Jutes.
 

Similar History Discussions