Who did most to defeat the Axis? Britain, the US or the USSR?

Who did most to defeat the Axis?

  • The British Empire

    Votes: 10 13.7%
  • The US

    Votes: 9 12.3%
  • The USSR

    Votes: 52 71.2%
  • Other (China?)

    Votes: 2 2.7%

  • Total voters
    73
Jul 2017
50
France
A good illustration of the fact that the Germans did everything to avoid being captured by the Soviets towards the end of the war, they were even ready to fight to capitulate to the French, the English, the Americans, but not the Soviets (because they were afraid of their revenge)

The Prague Offensive Prague Offensive - Wikipedia

"However, in southeastern Germany, parts of Austria and Czechoslovakia, there were still large bodies of active German troops of Army Group Centre and the remnants of Army Group Ostmark. On 2 May 1945, general Alfred Jodl ordered the German forces to avoid being captured by Russia and facilitate the separated negotiation with Western Allies.[6] The German remnant forces continued to resist the USSR 4th and 1st Ukrainian Fronts while only accepting an armistice on the Western Front."

"10–11 May
With Soviet units in Prague and pushing further west and south into Bohemia, the Soviet military objectives of the offensive had been met. The bulk of German troops in Army Group Centre were taken prisoner by the Soviets in the two days following the liberation of Prague, while elements of the 1st and 2nd Ukrainian Fronts pushed west to the Chemnitz-Karlovy Vary-Plzen demarcation line with U.S. forces.[41] With these unit movements, the Prague Offensive concluded three days after Victory in Europe Day.


Fearing their treatment at the hands of the locals or Soviet Army troops,[43] remnant formations of Army Group Centre continued resistance until 10/11 May, and in the cases of some small units, later into May 1945. The left flank of the 2nd Ukrainian Front met with troops of the U.S. Third Army (George Patton) in the regions of České Budějovice and Písek. Later, 1st and 2nd Ukrainian Fronts met with Americans in the regions of Karlovy Vary and Klatovy."

German prisoners of war in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia

"According to Edward Peterson, the U.S. chose to hand over several hundred thousand German prisoners to the Soviet Union in May 1945 as a "gesture of friendship".[15] Niall Ferguson maintains that "it is clear that many German units sought to surrender to the Americans in preference to other Allied forces, and particularly the Red Army".[16] Heinz Nawratil maintains that U.S. forces refused to accept the surrender of German troops in Saxony and Bohemia, and instead handed them over to the Soviet Union.[17]"


The majority of the Germans who fought the Soviets fled to capitulate to the English or Americans or the French (900,000 will capitulate to the French!)
 
Last edited:
Dec 2011
3,549
Pacific theater, superbomber wasn't needed. Submarine Force Pacific Fleet demolished the Japanese Navy AND Merchant Marine, accounting for roughly twice the tonnage of all the other Allies COMBINED.

Atlantic theater, absolutely. That was the mission the Peacemaker was designed to fulfill. It was deprioritized due to lack of need after Germany failed to subdue England.

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Whilst we destroyed the Japanese oil supplies in the Indian Ocean and fought them continuously in Burma? The Peacemaker didn't even fly until after VE day!
 
Whilst we destroyed the Japanese oil supplies in the Indian Ocean and fought them continuously in Burma? The Peacemaker didn't even fly until after VE day!
1) Submarine Force Pacific Fleet accounted for about twice the shipping tonnage of all the other Allies COMBINED. USS TANG alone destroyed 116000 tons of Japanese shipping.

1.5) Burma. Tell that to the Marines. They were liberating Guadalcanal, Peleliu, New Britain, Saipan, Iwo, and Okinawa at an average of a few weeks each.

2) The B36 wasn't built because it wasn't needed. Had the German military succeeded in getting England out of the war, a simple matter of resource allocation. Willow Run would have cranked out one B36 every other hour all day for 2 9 hour shifts instead of one B24 every 63 minutes.

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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,847
Sydney
One of the most productive operation of the US submarines was to sink with deck guns the Japanese fishing boats
it had a severe effect on the Japanese food supply
 
Dec 2011
3,549
1) Submarine Force Pacific Fleet accounted for about twice the shipping tonnage of all the other Allies COMBINED. USS TANG alone destroyed 116000 tons of Japanese shipping.

1.5) Burma. Tell that to the Marines. They were liberating Guadalcanal, Peleliu, New Britain, Saipan, Iwo, and Okinawa at an average of a few weeks each.

2) The B36 wasn't built because it wasn't needed. Had the German military succeeded in getting England out of the war, a simple matter of resource allocation. Willow Run would have cranked out one B36 every other hour all day for 2 9 hour shifts instead of one B24 every 63 minutes.

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1. But those ships had no oil to transport thanks to the RN
2. Do you really think it's practical to bomb the Fatherland across the Atlantic? Not to mention they would have had no escort fighters?
3. Yes, island by island with long breaks in between, Burma was continuous.
 
1. But those ships had no oil to transport thanks to the RN
2. Do you really think it's practical to bomb the Fatherland across the Atlantic? Not to mention they would have had no escort fighters?
3. Yes, island by island with long breaks in between, Burma was continuous.
1. You're dodging the point. USN: 9.7 million tons, ALL allied Navies other than the USN, 0.1 million tons. Source:

https://www.history.navy.mil/resear...val-merchant-shipping-losses-wwii.html#pageiv

2) The fact remains that the Peacemaker was designed to do just that. Spent a lot of her career making runs long enough to be from Newfoundland, Maine, or Iceland or Greenland to Occupied Europe. IIRC the B36 operated from Greenland at least as a routine training exercise.

3) Dodging the point, again. We WON them all, liberating the islands in the face of some of the most fanatical resistance in military history in a matter of days to weeks on average.

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Dec 2011
3,549
1. You're dodging the point. USN: 9.7 million tons, ALL allied Navies other than the USN, 0.1 million tons. Source:

https://www.history.navy.mil/resear...val-merchant-shipping-losses-wwii.html#pageiv

2) The fact remains that the Peacemaker was designed to do just that. Spent a lot of her career making runs long enough to be from Newfoundland, Maine, or Iceland or Greenland to Occupied Europe. IIRC the B36 operated from Greenland at least as a routine training exercise.

3) Dodging the point, again. We WON them all, liberating the islands in the face of some of the most fanatical resistance in military history in a matter of days to weeks on average.

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True, the sinking of the Jap merchant fleet was largely a US affair but it wasn't the whole story in their defeat
I don't know about the Peacemaker, I rather doubt the entire concept would ever have worked but it's all speculative
And our guys fought in Burma continually for YEARS! Not days or weeks
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,847
Sydney
A mention of Australia favorite pom ,
William Slim a soldier general who is largely forgotten in spite of being by far the best of the bunch
he did the exceptional as routine and the impossible when needed
with a second rate motley crew which he forged into a first class conquering army
few could equal him , none surpass