Who do you think Jack the Ripper was?

Jan 2017
1,308
Durham
One thing seems certain to me , the ripper was very familiar with the locations
certainly a man and very probably a white British of some education
There was no reason why he needed to be familiar with the locations. In those days people went to work at all times during the day and night and many were butchers, and so people were used to seeing blood on people at 3 in the morning. Also, in those days the police pretty much had to catch someone red-handed for obvious reasons. That doesn't mean he didn't live in that area but it does mean he could have lived a bit farther afield just as easily.
 
Jan 2017
1,308
Durham
I agree that the Ripper was not a policeman - they had set beats and being far from them would be suspicious. People don't want the Ripper to have been just some guy, that's not glamorous and it doesn't sell any books, but that's probably exactly who he was. Since hundreds of people have been named as the Ripper, the real killer might have been mentioned, but he's certainly not one of the popular suspects. (Of course most of the popular suspects are accused by hoaxes and/or have alibis.) I agree that the graffito had nothing to do with the Ripper - too many people try to look at real crime as if it was a whodunit.
The only one of those mentioned who rings true to me is Aaron Kosminski, but even then I'm not convinced Kosminski's naming in the marginalia is genuine. If it is then he is a very strong suspect, but as I say I think there's a good chance the notes were doctored. I think Cutbush is exactly the type of person who would have commited those crimes. Apart from that, none of the names mentioned are viable suspects.
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,643
Spain
Leather apron was not an elegant Victorian gentleman as a kind of the very libertine Duke of Clarence ...nor a kind of ghoul that came out from the dead to terrorize the nights of London ... as Punch portraited...he was only a looking harmless poor little man...full of personal and sexual frustrations ... if we had a time machine and we could see it in Buck's Row ... we would be surprised and with our astonishing face we would say.... It's not possible ".. that idiot couldn't be Jack the ripper!
 
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Jan 2017
1,308
Durham
Leather apron was not an elegant Victorian gentleman as a kind of the very libertine Duke of Clarence ...nor a kind of ghoul that came out from the dead to terrorize the nights of London ... as Punch portraited...he was only a looking harmless poor little man...full of personal and sexual frustrations ... if we had a time machine and we could see it in Buck's Row ... we would be surprised and with our astonishing face we would say.... It's not possible ".. that idiot couldn't be Jack the ripper!
The East End of London back then was desperate, and those streets in particular would have been the most dangerous in the country and some of the most dangerous in the world. It was teeming with gangs, street robbery, prostitution, alcoholism and people with mental disorders. It could have been any one of thousands of people. Also, given that the area was home to people of many countries, it could have been someone from one of a few nationalities. Having said that, murder, at least recorded murder, was extremely rare in London during that time period.

Although there could well have been a sexual element to the murders, it appears to me that the murderer was delusional and was pretty much carrying out some sort of warped medical procedure. The one chance he had to take more time behind closed doors was just absolute carnage and in my mind gives a clearer indication of his mental state, and anyone looking at those photos would be hard pressed to find a similar level of violence inflicted upon anyone of any time period anywhere in the world. So, I think you have someone with a serious mental disorder and probably did end up in an asylum.
 
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Fiver

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
3,764
I think Jack could be a police, yes. And that would explain him understanding human anatomy well, considering a higher rank may need to watch peoppe be disected very often.
Period Police officers, regardless of rank, did not typically attend autopsies.

Jack didn't just kill 'people'. And he didn't just 'kill' people either. Jack dissected prostitute women, then very very carefully pulled out their innards. In a way, that is what prostitutes do with abortions. And at this time prositution was a very popular choice that women were making on their own as well because it was considered a way for any woman to get on her own feet and be strong and independent on her own. There was a pride and beauty to it to women of that age, even if it was only beautiful to them and not those that looked at them.
There was no "pride and beauty" to prostitution in Whitechapel. It was not "considered a way for any woman to get on her own feet", most of the vctims stuggled to get enough money for food and a cheap doss house to sleep the night. They did not "have fine clothing", as their autopsy reports clearly show.t was not a way for a woman to be "strong and independent", it was a desperate and dangerous choice.

The Ripper did not "very very carefully pulled out their innards. He attacked in a frenzy, and clearly derived pleasure from inflicting the mutilations.
 

Fiver

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
3,764
One thing seems certain to me , the ripper was very familiar with the locations
certainly a man and very probably a white British of some education
The Ripper probably was very familiar with the area. He appears to have been interrupted in the Polly Nichols and Elizabeth Stride cases, yet he managed to slip away undetected.

There is no evidence about the Ripper's education level. None of the hundred of letters can be definitely tied to the killer.
 
Jan 2017
1,308
Durham
The Ripper probably was very familiar with the area. He appears to have been interrupted in the Polly Nichols and Elizabeth Stride cases, yet he managed to slip away undetected.
I wouldn't necessarily agree with that. Anyone interrupted is going to have to move on quickly and walk down the street. 'Doesn't matter where he was from. The chances are he wore dark clothing and so any blood wasn't noticeable, but even if it was he'd have passed for someone working in the butchery trade. By the time the police were on the scene and conducting a search he was long gone.

There is absolutely no reason to think he was a local other than serial killers tend to start off close to home.
 

Fiver

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
3,764
I wouldn't necessarily agree with that. Anyone interrupted is going to have to move on quickly and walk down the street. 'Doesn't matter where he was from. The chances are he wore dark clothing and so any blood wasn't noticeable, but even if it was he'd have passed for someone working in the butchery trade. By the time the police were on the scene and conducting a search he was long gone.

There is absolutely no reason to think he was a local other than serial killers tend to start off close to home.
There a plenty of reasons to think the Ripper was a local.
* As you note, serial killers tend to start off close to home.
* Both times that he was interrupted, the Ripper did not just "move on quickly and walk down the street", he was not even seen walking away. That might be mere luck, but it is more likely the Ripper was very familiar with the area.
^ After he was interrupted in the mutilation of Stride, the Ripper knew the areas well enough to reach the Mitre Square in time to kill Eddowes.
* Part of Eddowes' apron was found in Ghoulston Street, which was still in the area.
* The killer took organs from Chapman, Eddowes, and Kelly. Being caught with these 'trophies' would be even harder to explain than bloodstains, so odds are the Ripper didn't have to travel very far before reaching his lodging.
* Chapman was killed within an hour of sunrise, probably within half an hour, so the killer had to live close enough to get home before sunrise.