Who doesn't believe in vaccines?

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,034
Netherlands
#51
Dunning-Kruger effect is only one of many variables that in my opinion have lead to the current anti-vaccination movement. There are other factors, at least I believe. Some people seem naturally prone to believing conspiracy theories*, the rise of internet has also lead to the rise in access to information that feeds conspiracy theories and misinformation. Just as the internet serves as a fertile breeding ground for investigation of proper up to date peer reviewed knowledge, so has it led to the massive spread of outdated, poorly investigated information, fake news, propaganda, etc. So just as the internet joins those who are interesting in ''proper'' academic knowledge with scholarly methods and trained minds (I'm sorry if this sounds a bit cocky) so does it join those who don't have those tools (who will believe anything written...) or who straight up want to believe misinformation or propagate it. We also have to take into account groups that due to their history and culture are already suspicious of anything that seems mainstream culture (religious groups would fall in this category).

*I would argue some people showing the Dunning-Kruger effect want to believe conspiracy theories as a way of feeling special and or 'fighting the system'.
A bit too simple. There is a whole sh*tload of medical conditions that were caused by something, where the powers that be either denied or downplayed it with the help of medical research. Just think of the DES daughters or the weekly x increases the risk of cancer research.
So it isn't really surprising people don't trust it.
With vaccines there is also some weirdness going on. Adding or not adding mercury and the amount of vaccines. Here my kids get about 14 in total, but I know that in US it can be much more.
 

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,037
Santiago de Chile
#53
A bit too simple. There is a whole sh*tload of medical conditions that were caused by something, where the powers that be either denied or downplayed it with the help of medical research. Just think of the DES daughters or the weekly x increases the risk of cancer research.
So it isn't really surprising people don't trust it.
With vaccines there is also some weirdness going on. Adding or not adding mercury and the amount of vaccines. Here my kids get about 14 in total, but I know that in US it can be much more.
It's definitely a complex issue.
 

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,037
Santiago de Chile
#55
That is why I don't like the oversimplification, that when you question vaccines, you automatically are some kind of flat earth groupie.
I suppose it would depend, for me at least, why and how you question vaccines. But then again i'm a believer in vaccines.
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,034
Netherlands
#56
I suppose it would depend, for me at least, why and how you question vaccines. But then again i'm a believer in vaccines.
Oh they most definitely work. But just like with pills there will be side effects and there is the issue of storage and the amount of vaccines.
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,722
Seattle
#57
Let us look it from another standpoint. That kid, whose parents were antivaxxers and who got tetanus, cost us, the country, the taxpayers, $ 800,000 in treatment.

Now there is another case, a kid with tuberous sclerosis who is very ill and who inadvertently was exposed to measles from an unvaccinated child, in a hospital. I hope he is fine, but if not, expect lawsuits, etc.

When people treated for cancer, with low immunity, get exposed to all these infections, by sitting next to kids who are in incubation period, they might die. And their treatment is already expensive.

How much did it cost to us all to pay for ICU treatments during the outbreak of measles among Somalian immigrants?

Why do we, as taxpayers, have to pay that much for someone's stupidity ending up in costly hospitalizations? Let us push all these costs back to sources. To the parents of the kid with tetanus, to the mom of the girl with measles, to all antivaxxers community, to Somalian refugees, to the Episcopalian community of Polk, to Orthodox Jews community of NY.

This will yield results fast.
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,722
Seattle
#58
That is why I don't like the oversimplification, that when you question vaccines, you automatically are some kind of flat earth groupie.
I think we as consumers have the right to demand that expensive medications and vaccines produced by our pharmaceutical campaigns are of the best quality, and extensively tested. That CDC hires smart people, and not someone who could not make it into a nurse. That there is more transparency about side effects of medications. Would this make sense?
 
Feb 2014
232
Miami
#59
I think the whole issue is this belief crap. Evidence base medicine does not have any belief crap anywhere in it. It has been shown to work and the minimal risks are rare or way better than dying of polio. The companies should be liable though if they make a bad batch that causes gullian barre syndrome or what have you just like any bad product should make a producer liable
 
Likes: arkteia
Oct 2013
6,207
Planet Nine, Oregon
#60
'People with low knowledge about science are also less likely to see high preventive health benefits from vaccines. While 91% of those with high science knowledge said vaccines provided high preventive health benefits, only 55% of those with low science knowledge agreed. In addition, those with low science knowledge were more likely to consider the risk of side effects to be medium or high (47% vs. 19% of those with high science knowledge). Americans who did not correctly recognize the definition for “herd immunity” were less likely to rate the benefits of the MMR vaccine as high and were comparatively more likely to see the risk of side effects as at least medium. (Herd immunity refers to the health benefits that occur when most people in a population have been vaccinated.)'
5 facts about vaccines in the U.S.