Who doesn't believe in vaccines?

Oct 2015
5,183
Matosinhos Portugal
#71
I am 72 and still have the BCG vaccine mark on my arm! I had measles when I was about 4, no vaccines about then!

Wow, my friend, you're a young 27-year-old.
I also had measles when I was 5 years old I remember seeing my whole body red and full of fever as I said before I took the vaccine at school when I was 6 years old.


Friendly hug tuesdayschild
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,722
Seattle
#72
Wow, my friend, you're a young 27-year-old.
I also had measles when I was 5 years old I remember seeing my whole body red and full of fever as I said before I took the vaccine at school when I was 6 years old.
I had "mitigated" postvaccination measles. Either a mild form caused by early vaccine, or possibly I was already falling ill with measles, and the vaccine made it milder.

Anyhow, the way it looked, I got that vaccine at school, and then everyone in class was OK, and I got that measles. Not very severe, though, but enough to cause such hysteria in my parents, that I actually had medical exemption from all subsequent vaccinations.

(That was not good). When I moved to the US, I was found to have antibodies to.measles but not to rubella.

I had one child. Had I contracted rubella during that pregnancy, it would have been horrible.

Surveillance Manual | Congenital Rubella Syndrome | VPDs | Vaccines | CDC

So I got rubella vaccination (,as a single vaccine, they exist, btw).

My mom who was very smart had the makings of an antivaxxer, I think. Why refuse all other vaccines for your child just because mitigated measles happened?
 

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,722
Seattle
#73
Here we are, it had to happen, sooner or later.

Measles leaves Israeli flight attendant in coma - CNN

A 43-year old Israeli flight attendant (vaccinated) got measles and is in ICU. In a coma. Encephalitis.Can’t breathe on her own now.

She probably got it from ultra-Orthodox nuts. JMO.

CDC recommends 2 rounds of vaccinations now.

(The issue is if these religtards never vaccinated their kids, they have some immunity to measles in their community. They - do. We, living next to these antivaxxers, don’t).

For the rest of us, measles stopped being an endemic disease. Gone are the times when in Europe, everyone would have measles. If unvaccinated, our kids have as much immunity to it as the Native Americans facing the Pilgrims.

Vaccinate your kids.
 
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Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,686
Europe
#74
Vaccines are worth the risk. Measles, TB and so on are serious illnesses, especially for children/the vulnerable . I dont understand why anyone would refuse a medical procedure that has been so tried and tested.
 
Apr 2018
972
Upland, Sweden
#75
I like the principle behind vaccines. Everytime I think about them I think about Nietzsche's saying "What doesn't kill me makes me stronger" - great testament to human ingenuity really, and a much more sophisticated way of solving medical problems than many other forms of disease control.

Although my inner conspiracy theorist could probably be made to believe they were dangerous, as I am cynical and mistrustful enough of all forms of centralized solutions to social problems already. I don't know about the claims of them "causing" autism though. I have a hard time believing anyone actually understand the clear causality behind autism - if anything modern society itself might be just as much to blame for such increases...

We did have some pretty credible case in Sweden of vaccines causing narcolepsy related to H1N1. This is regrettable, but it is a matter of benefits/ costs to society at large. Right now I think the benefits outweigh the costs...
 
Likes: arkteia

arkteia

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
4,722
Seattle
#76
I like the principle behind vaccines. Everytime I think about them I think about Nietzsche's saying "What doesn't kill me makes me stronger" - great testament to human ingenuity really, and a much more sophisticated way of solving medical problems than many other forms of disease control.

Although my inner conspiracy theorist could probably be made to believe they were dangerous, as I am cynical and mistrustful enough of all forms of centralized solutions to social problems already. I don't know about the claims of them "causing" autism though. I have a hard time believing anyone actually understand the clear causality behind autism - if anything modern society itself might be just as much to blame for such increases...

We did have some pretty credible case in Sweden of vaccines causing narcolepsy related to H1N1. This is regrettable, but it is a matter of benefits/ costs to society at large. Right now I think the benefits outweigh the costs...
I believe narcolepsy was (probably, unmasked) by H1N1 vaccine only in people with certain genetic variant. And they have redone the vaccine since then.
 
Feb 2019
345
California
#79
Rockland County, BY has deckared an emergency over a measles outbreak. Italy has said "no vaccination, no education". In the UK, vaccination rates have been falling.

False information linking vaccination to autism has been partly blamed.

So my question to you is - who amongst you does NOT believe in vaccination?
Idiots. I don't know how high your i.q. is above "average" (I assume it is quite considerably so based on your posts and the fact that you hang out here) and I know it is difficult for smarter than "average" (100 i.q.) people to internalize this---but there are as many people BELOW that line as there are above it (many of these people work in Hollywood and some even win Oscars). Have you ever tried to explain something patently obvious to someone only to finally give up when it dawns on you that they literally just do not possess the capacity to wrap their brains around it any more than I have the capacity to dunk a basketball?