Who's fault was it for the poor defense of flanks of German 6th Army at Stalingrad?

Mrbsct

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
2,638
USA
#1
Who's fault was it the flanks of Paulus's 6th Army were not well secured and only guarded by low tier Romanian and Hungarian Armies during Case Blue/Stalingrad?

Paulus had zero commands over these armies(including the Panzer 4th army) right besides the 6th? Was it all Hitler's placement? Did Bock(commander of entire Case Blue besides Hitler) and Von Weichs(commander of Army Group B) have any operational say in these army group placement and field army placements or were they only commanders in name, who did everything Hitler said?

I feel like Army Group A and Group B should have bunched joined together and joined their German units to take city(6th army was too few), and Hungarian and Romanian Armies along few Panzer elements should have been sent to less defended oil fields to destroy them.
 

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,784
Stockport Cheshire UK
#2
Who's fault was it the flanks of Paulus's 6th Army were not well secured and only guarded by low tier Romanian and Hungarian Armies during Case Blue/Stalingrad?

Paulus had zero commands over these armies(including the Panzer 4th army) right besides the 6th? Was it all Hitler's placement? Did Bock(commander of entire Case Blue besides Hitler) and Von Weichs(commander of Army Group B) have any operational say in these army group placement and field army placements or were they only commanders in name, who did everything Hitler said?

I feel like Army Group A and Group B should have bunched joined together and joined their German units to take city(6th army was too few), and Hungarian and Romanian Armies along few Panzer elements should have been sent to less defended oil fields to destroy them.
The original plan for invading the Soviet Union.
The original plan called for the destruction of all serious Soviet military opposition within a few hundred miles of the border.
When that didn't happen, the German's were forced to advance further and further into Soviet terrority, and even mile they advanced reduced their ability to supply their forces properly.
So by the time they got to Stalingrad they were fatally over-extended, and there was nothing they could do to alter it.
 

starman

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
4,081
Connecticut
#3
Who's fault was it the flanks of Paulus's 6th Army were not well secured and only guarded by low tier Romanian and Hungarian Armies during Case Blue/Stalingrad?
That's because German units had been taken from the flanks and thrown into Stalingrad.

I feel like Army Group A and Group B should have bunched joined together and joined their German units to take city(6th army was too few),
Na, they should've just "masked' or contained Stalingrad, and used the bulk of 6th army to defend the Don flank.

and Hungarian and Romanian Armies along few Panzer elements should have been sent to less defended oil fields to destroy them.
Army group A should've gotten supply priority to do that while B held the flank.
 
Feb 2013
6,724
#4
The fault was with the original concept of Operation Blue, which assumed the same state that withstood a much larger tripartite offensive shrivels and dies from a smaller offensive launched on a logistical shoestring reliant on that same errant premise that battlefield defeats initiate the collapse of the Soviet state. If you want the moment when the design failed, it was the Battle of Millerovo, when the USSR avoided what might otherwise have been a debacle on par with the 1941 Kiev battle by a retreat. Because of this, the Germans were going to run into the same logistics and manpower problems they did before, against an enemy rather more formidable in the summer and fall of 1942 than was the case a year prior. Reality ensues in such cases.
 
#5
Na, they should've just "masked' or contained Stalingrad, and used the bulk of 6th army to defend the Don flank.

This. They were drawn into taking Stalingrad when there was no need. Hitler fatally extended Case Blue. He also added further objectives in the Southern axis of the operation.
 
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
#6
On Hungarian and Romanian troops : I think none of the two allies threw everything in battle (after all, they were enemies, so they tried to keep a reserve for after).
It is why they never kept promises to Hitler on the amount of troops, and as Hitler didn't trust any of them,he never kept his promise on arming them.
 
Feb 2011
509
#7
On Hungarian and Romanian troops : I think none of the two allies threw everything in battle (after all, they were enemies, so they tried to keep a reserve for after).
It is why they never kept promises to Hitler on the amount of troops, and as Hitler didn't trust any of them,he never kept his promise on arming them.
Hitler and the German state could not provide the equipment and materiel it required for its own use never mind arm other Axis nations adequately.

It replaced totally obsolete equipment as fast as it could and sold that equipment on at inflated prices to its Allies, but it was always short itself despite production from Germany and the Occupied nations.

The Germans made small leavenings of equipment (sometimes only authorised at front or army level and not higher command) to help its allies but never enough as it did not have spare capacity.
 
Nov 2009
3,888
Outer world
#8
On Hungarian and Romanian troops : I think none of the two allies threw everything in battle (after all, they were enemies, so they tried to keep a reserve for after).
It is why they never kept promises to Hitler on the amount of troops, and as Hitler didn't trust any of them,he never kept his promise on arming them.
Romanians fought valiantly but there's little you can do when Russians threw at you an entire armoured corps and you have no AT weapons.
The fault is of the stupidity and arrogance of the German HQ which overextended a scarce force over two too ambitious plans (Caucasus and Stalingrad) and overstretched the supply lines.
Without the allies, Germans would be unable even to reach Stalingrad probably.
 

funakison

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,381
Between a rock and a hard place
#10
Whose fault was it, well the usual suspects come to mind aka Adolf Hitler. Maximilian von Weichs who commanded the forces in that theatre of war warned Hitler that the flanks were dangerously exposed. To have left the soviets with bridgeheads over the Don river was inexcusable.
 

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