Why are Hong Kongers all of a suddenly protesting for democracy when they were never a democracy?

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,501
China
Except some Hong.Kong people. Or are they not chinese?
you remember what?
tell me

those who lives in hk but reject vow to be loyal to china nation, will not be given seats in councils.

no more, no less.

but if any put violence against laws, such as destroying public equipment, insult national flag or emblem, beating elders....will be punished accordingly, be it chinese or westerners. that is the rule of law.
jails are made for a purpose. in most nations, the jails are filled by their own people, and there are reasons.
 

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,929
Bulgaria
@HackneyedScribe i do understand why you posted #143. I suspect that the utter disrespect towards this old lady is quite repulsive to you (and to me to be honest). Most of the people here see a confrontation between a person and a group, but failed to comprehend the importance of the age of this lady in this conflict (cultural differences?). I am not interested about the current situation in Hong Kong all i see is an elder mistreated by youngsters and the little i know about China (mostly ancient and medieval history) this is simply unacceptable.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,740
meaningless title of "hongkong", as if hongkong is one identity with one thought.
The Hongkongers have been taking to the streets by the tens of thousands for months , because those street protests are the ONLY manifestation of a Hongkong public opinion that is even possible under the current system.

THAT is the reason HK has seen months of street protests. The size and determination of them decides their relevance AND representativity of Hongkong in general. Because any other mechanism is disallowed. Their size and determination says the government in Beijing has a problem.

And the size and determination of them says they represent Hongkong – precisely because it is the ONLY WAY the public in Hongkong can express itself publically.

It would of course be wonderful for the government in Beijing if it just could decree that they did not exist, or at least did count, because Beijing doesn't allow it.

But there they are, by the thousands still, and continuing.

Even if it would be accepted that any manifestation of public opinion that Beijig has not OK:d in advance is illegal and perverse, because the CCP represents the Chinese public at large in it's highest (and only legal) potency, even then the situation in HK says Beijng has failed in this.

It knows it too. Which is why its preferred ad hoc resort to explain away the prostest is invented "foreign intervention". Saves them from having to face the real problem. It might work for domestic consumption in mainland China, since the CCP and government controls information. Outside of it, it smacks of desperation and cowardice. And frankly Beijing is not so cut-off from opinion outside China as not to notice that is how it is coming across.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,501
China
The Hongkongers have been taking to the streets by the tens of thousands for months , because those street protests are the ONLY manifestation of a Hongkong public opinion that is even possible under the current system.
......
you just repeating yourself.

and with a failing math about what is called majority
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,501
China
@HackneyedScribe i do understand why you posted #143. I suspect that the utter disrespect towards this old lady is quite repulsive to you (and to me to be honest). Most of the people here see a confrontation between a person and a group, but failed to comprehend the importance of the age of this lady in this conflict (cultural differences?). I am not interested about the current situation in Hong Kong all i see is an elder mistreated by youngsters and the little i know about China (mostly ancient and medieval history) this is simply unacceptable.
surly not acceptable