Why are Tibet, Yunnan & Xinjiang in China, not independent like Korea & Vietnam?

Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,480
Malaysia
Why are Tibet, Yunnan & Xinjiang in China, not independent like Korea & Vietnam?

They were all once independent, but today they are all a part of China. This is just the complete opposite of Korea & Vietnam, who were both once parts of China, but today both independent.

Let's hv your thoughts.
 
Sep 2012
1,116
Taiwan
They were Qing territories which only enjoyed limited autonomy (Tibet aside) after the Xinhai Revolution in 1911. The Guomindang still maintained a presence there, as did other regional Chinese warlords. Thus when the Communist's seized power in 1949, it was relatively easy to re-assert control. That and the CCP worked well with ethnic groups within each region, so there were already native communist cadres by the end of the civil war.

Korea and Vietnam are very different, inasmuch that they weren't Qing territories, and had their own (post-)colonial circumstances that precluded China from becoming too involved in any kind of annexation.
 

Naima

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
2,323
Venice
Plus China mass migrated tons of Han people into Tibet to make them a majority and make the original population a minority in their own lands.
Shuld be Tibet free again it would probably need to espell en mass lots of Chinese han.
Indeed Tibet should be a free nation as it had been for centuries and as them the Ouïghour region.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,501
China
Plus China mass migrated tons of Han people into Tibet to make them a majority and make the original population a minority in their own lands.
Shuld be Tibet free again it would probably need to espell en mass lots of Chinese han.
Indeed Tibet should be a free nation as it had been for centuries and as them the Ouïghour region.
the fifth population statistics inspection data, made in 2001:
tot population of tibet 2,6163,0000
among which- tibetan 2,4272,0000


so i guess we need to expell 1891,0000 hans and others ~7.2%
(but....who says tibet only had had tibetans??)
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Q for the OP.
xinjiang....?
maybe you wanted say there could be an eastern turkistan there (anyway, no such country ever existed)
and yunnan??????? what country could be there?
 
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YouLoveMeYouKnowIt

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
4,574
Canada
Plus China mass migrated tons of Han people into Tibet to make them a majority and make the original population a minority in their own lands.
Shuld be Tibet free again it would probably need to espell en mass lots of Chinese han.
Indeed Tibet should be a free nation as it had been for centuries and as them the Ouïghour region.
This is a myth. Provide evidence.
 

YouLoveMeYouKnowIt

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
4,574
Canada
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  1. Robert Barnett, Thunder from Tibet, a review of Pico Iyer's book, The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Knopf, 275 p., in The New York Review of Books, vol. 55, number 9. 29 May 2008.


  • Schaik, Sam (2011). Tibet: A History. New Haven: Yale University Press Publications. ISBN 978-0-300-15404-7.
Thanks, I guess?

Obviously you type a couple keywords into Google and then copy and paste, just hoping people will forget it and take your word. But you screwed up here.

You asserted that Han are the majority in Tibet. Han are the vast minority and the only sizeable population is in Lhasa.
 
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heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,501
China
Pretty sure Eastern Turkestan existed, de facto if not de jure.
what is its name? i don't know any lost country named as "eastern turkestan". i don't even know there any was any turkic people in xinjiang. the fact is that, in history, it was uygur who put the final military stress upon turks, and pushed them to west. that was a history when they were still both on the mongol steppe.
then who was the leader? who were the people under the ruling? how long it lasted?


the closest one i can imagine is Yarkant, ended by Dzungaria.
then there was the Yaqub Beg in the 19th century, but he was a warlord from Kokand who shortly occupied part of xinjiang.
 
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Naima

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
2,323
Venice
Also despite what chinese propgaganda might say , tibet once was larger than the so called autonomous region , infact most of it had been simply split and incorporated into chinese borders.




China&#8217;s Tibet is part of a propaganda offensive intended to reverse China&#8217;s failure to convince the
world of the legitimacy of its rule over Tibet. Despite the fact, often repeated by China, that no
country in the world recognizes Tibetan independence, the legitimacy of China&#8217;s conquest and rule
over Tibet is questionable on the grounds of Tibet&#8217;s right, as a nation separate from the Chinese
nation, to national self-determination. Despite China&#8217;s best propaganda efforts, Tibet is generally
regarded in world opinion as having been a country separate from China in the past and of having
been unwillingly made a part of China at present. China&#8217;s &#8220;peaceful liberation&#8221; of Tibet is regarded
as an invasion. China&#8217;s destruction of Tibetan culture and abuses of Tibetan human rights are well
known. Also well known is the fact that the Chinese invasion and occupation of Tibet resulted in
the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Tibetans and the exile of many thousands more, including
the rightful ruler of Tibet, the Dalai Lama.
http://www.rfa.org/english/news/tibet/warrensmithbooks/Warren7.pdf
 
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