Why can't the East Asian countries learn from Europe?

Jun 2017
2,908
Connecticut
#51
Just to touch on the demographics; USA saw such a massive influx of immigrants because Europe was at its maximum capacity already. The demographics were already changing due to natural development as well. This seems quite uniform across most of Europe, the last big population booms happening right after WW2. Same changes seem to have happened in USA as well for that matter.
Not exactly. Ireland had the potato famine. It currently has less people today. France is also quite large and is only 105th in population density today with 70 million people. Germany is about 60th but "Germany" is only about a third of what was traditionally considered "German". England might be at top capacity but England is about 50,000 square miles.

WWI and WWII's arguably largest catalyst was France's fear over losing her status as a great power because of her lower birthrate. France had always been the most populous nation in Europe since nations started existing, then Russia took over, then united Germany, then Austria-Hungary, UK and eventually even little Italy during the interwar period. Of course WWII considerably closed that gap. It's still worth noting that despite France's immigrants solving the demographic crisis, Germany has about 10 million more people on about 60,000 square miles less than the Germany the French a century ago were anxious about. Italy and the UK however were surpassed by the French due to immigration.
 
Likes: Gvelion
May 2017
172
Monterrey
#52
Not exactly. Ireland had the potato famine. It currently has less people today. France is also quite large and is only 105th in population density today with 70 million people. Germany is about 60th but "Germany" is only about a third of what was traditionally considered "German". England might be at top capacity but England is about 50,000 square miles.
Well, the reason why potato famine was so devastating that large parts of the population lived on potato alone. Finland had a similar famine, as did several other countries around the time. Comparing what is available today vis-a-vis in 19th and early 20th century kinda doesn't take into account all the technological advances during this time. The largest driving factor in declining birth rates is women being treated equally anyways, a development that started in early 20th century. Turns out they might want to do something else with their life than pop out one kind after another...