Why did Ashkenazi Jews historically speak Yiddish?

Feb 2011
1,005
Scotland
#52
Post # 32 was a simple statement that genetics could not provide a conclusive answer either way.

As for my hypothesis, I have provided the bases for them, address them if you can.
Edit is appreciated, thank you- it's an hypothesis, but not more. Your hypothesis/statement/basis is not capable of proof and has little to support it. It is in the end, a matter of opinion rather than proof. I suspect we shall just agree to disagree.
 
Likes: M.S. Islam
Feb 2011
1,005
Scotland
#53
Since I am not a speaker, I can't tell.
Yiddish speakers should be able to easily learn Hebrew in my opinion since Yiddish uses the same alphabet and does have some words from Hebrew. Also, Yiddish speakers pray in Hebrew (as far as I am aware) and use Yiddish as an everyday language.
However, I think its harder the other way around, since Hebrew speakers would have to learn what pretty much amounts to German written in Hebrew alphabet, with different grammar rules. However, I think Yiddish would still be easier to learn than pretty much any other "real" European language.

As far as I am aware, if two western and eastern Yiddish speakers meet, they would be able to talk to each other. Western Yiddish is very rare though.
I understand a little Yiddish and my Mother and Grandmother spoke it. It is basically like German, with an admixture of Hebrew, Polish and Russian vocabulary, but formally written using Hebrew characters. (you can see it written in 'English' letters in books too- try the 'Joys of Yiddish' by Leo Rosten.) It is in effect a different language from Hebrew. To assume that the two are very similar would be a bit like writing German in Cyrillic characters and suggesting it is very similar to Russian.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,680
SoCal
#54
I understand a little Yiddish and my Mother and Grandmother spoke it. It is basically like German, with an admixture of Hebrew, Polish and Russian vocabulary, but formally written using Hebrew characters. (you can see it written in 'English' letters in books too- try the 'Joys of Yiddish' by Leo Rosten.) It is in effect a different language from Hebrew. To assume that the two are very similar would be a bit like writing German in Cyrillic characters and suggesting it is very similar to Russian.
Are you Jewish?
 
Jul 2012
3,109
Dhaka
#57
Edit is appreciated, thank you- it's an hypothesis, but not more. Your hypothesis/statement/basis is not capable of proof and has little to support it. It is in the end, a matter of opinion rather than proof. I suspect we shall just agree to disagree.
Sure. But then explain where did Khazars disappear to? Especially what happened to their language?

Also explain how did Ashkenazi from being 3% of world Jewry at 11th century, skyrocketed up to 40% by mid 17th century.

Note: Khazars disappeared around 11th century.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2012
565
#58
Sure. But then explain where did Khazars disappear to? Especially what happened to their language?

Also explain how did Ashkenazi from being 3% of world Jewry at 11th century, skyrocketed up to 40% by mid 17th century.

Note: Khazars disappeared around 11th century.
The question should be:what was the Ashkenazi population growth from 11th century to 12th century? In absolute numbers?
What happened to the Khazars? Maybe they were absorbed into the surrounding Turcic population.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,680
SoCal
#59
Sure. But then explain where did Khazars disappear to? Especially what happened to their language?

Also explain how did Ashkenazi from being 3% of world Jewry at 11th century, skyrocketed up to 40% by mid 17th century.

Note: Khazars disappeared around 11th century.
That's very likely due to the high Ashkenazi birth rates.
 
Jul 2012
3,109
Dhaka
#60
The question should be:what was the Ashkenazi population growth from 11th century to 12th century? In absolute numbers?
What happened to the Khazars? Maybe they were absorbed into the surrounding Turcic population.
If there's an estimate for number of Ashkenazi in 12th century, please cite.