Why did Emperors of India and China have so many mistresses?

Jan 2019
220
London, United Kingdom
Yes, a concubine's son was regarded as a prince. In Chinese history, the majority of emperors were born by concubines. There was no law of succession in ancient China.
Even if her son was a prince and became future emperor, she was still a concubine, a second-class woman in her family, wasn't she? Wasn't that a big insult?
 
Nov 2018
173
Denmark
Even if her son was a prince and became future emperor, she was still a concubine, a second-class woman in her family, wasn't she? Wasn't that a big insult?
As people have explained repeatedly.

It was not a downgrade in the status of becoming the emperor's concubine, it was an upgrade.

Maybe you can explain to me what benefits you feel about being here at Historum. I must admit I do not quite understand why you are here.

And said without sarcasm and in the best of intentions, if I may draw your attention to a forum, if you do not know it already, where I think you will have great pleasure in participating.

https://da.quora.com/
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
32,523
T'Republic of Yorkshire
WI assume a child of a royal concubine was considered a prince, even if he didn't have much chance of becoming emperor.
Asian succession didn't necessarily follow primogeniture, so the son of a concubine could certainly become Emperor, even if the chances were low. As I mentioned before, Cixi was a concubine when she gave birth tp her son, who would become Emperor.
Even if her son was a prince and became future emperor, she was still a concubine, a second-class woman in her family, wasn't she? Wasn't that a big insult?
If her son became Emperor, she would become the Dowager Empress, An Emperor would be free to raise her status, posthumously, if he wanted.
 
Mar 2019
20
Toronto
Asian succession didn't necessarily follow primogeniture, so the son of a concubine could certainly become Emperor, even if the chances were low. As I mentioned before, Cixi was a concubine when she gave birth tp her son, who would become Emperor. If her son became Emperor, she would become the Dowager Empress, An Emperor would be free to raise her status, posthumously, if he wanted.
Yes, Empress Wu Zetian also started as a concubine. Actually the most powerful women in Chinese history almost all started out as concubine (Except for Empress Lv of Han).
Almost all Empress Dowagers who were concubines were elevated to the status of Empress posthumously by their emperor sons.
 
Mar 2019
20
Toronto
Even if her son was a prince and became future emperor, she was still a concubine, a second-class woman in her family, wasn't she? Wasn't that a big insult?
You did not live in that time so you cannot think the way they thought. If you lived in that time I bet you would do anything possible to get into the Emperor's bedchamber because this is the fastest way to elevate your social status.