Why did few Germans settle in the Balkans, within Romania's 1914 borders, in central Ukraine, and in Belarus?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
I found this nifty map of German populations in Europe in 1937:



Anyway, what I found interesting is the almost complete absence of German settlements in the Balkans south of Belgrade, within Romania's 1914 borders other than on the coastline (also see here: https://www.cs.usfca.edu/~cruse/RomaniaMinicourse/RoyalFamily/romania_territory_during_20th_century.gif and here: https://i.redd.it/qwvb6u8zorjx.png ), in central Ukraine (also see here: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/36/Germans1897ua.PNG), and in Belarus. Anyway, what did the Balkans (with the exception of their northernmost tip, such as the Banat, northern Croatia, and Slovenia), the territory within Romania's 1914 borders, central Ukraine, and Belarus receive so little German migration over the centuries? Indeed, these regions were largely immune to the Ostsiedlung and to the subsequent German colonization in Russia and I'm not quite sure why.

Anyway, does anyone here have any thoughts in regards to this?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
To clarify--in Romania, the coastline along with Transylvania, Bukovina, and the Banat (all of which belonged to Austria-Hungary before 1918) had a lot of Germans in 1937, but the rest of Romania had barely any Germans. In Ukraine, the western parts (especially Volhynia) and the southern parts contained a lot of Germans, but not the central parts. The northernmost tip of Yugoslavia contained a lot of Germans, but not the rest of Yugoslavia contained barely any Germans. As for Belarus, no part of it appears to have had large numbers of Germans in 1937--or really at any point in time before that as far as I can recall. Why did these discrepancies in the number of Germans in these various regions exist? As in, why were most of the Balkans, the territory within Romania's 1914 borders other than the coastline, central Ukraine, and Belarus so unattractive for mass German settlement?
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,008
Iowa USA
Well. Where there were public works (Danube delta) that needed qualified technical workers we see German settlement along the several channels to the Black Sea on the Danube delta. Seems that during the 19th century the opportunity to earn inside Romania existed and there were Germans in Romania during 19th century.

I would have thought you might find my next statement obvious, but the somewhat feudal economy of the Ottoman Empire wasn't compatible with highly skilled migrants (whether German, Italian, Spanish, what-have-you speakers!) being fairly paid for their skills.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Well. Where there were public works (Danube delta) that needed qualified technical workers we see German settlement along the several channels to the Black Sea on the Danube delta.
That makes sense. I also know that Germans were necessary in Transylvania to protect the frontier--at least back during the Middle Ages.

Seems that during the 19th century the opportunity to earn inside Romania existed and there were Germans in Romania during 19th century.
Almost all of the Germans who lived within Romania's 1914 borders lived in Romania's coastal region (Dobruja), though:



Wallachia and western Moldavia both contained very few Germans. Why was this the case?

I would have thought you might find my next statement obvious, but the somewhat feudal economy of the Ottoman Empire wasn't compatible with highly skilled migrants (whether German, Italian, Spanish, what-have-you speakers!) being fairly paid for their skills.
Didn't the Ottoman Empire have a Jewish, Greek, and Armenian commercial class, though?
 
Apr 2017
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Most of the Balkans was ruled by the Ottoman empire until the later 19th century, they were enemies of the Austrians during this time and wouldn't be receptive to immigrants from them. Dobruja was sparsely populated, so always in need of settlers. If you look at the map pretty much all the areas were either ruled by german states or Russia, Poland and Hungary (who all utilized german settlers in their history). Exceptions being non-Transylvanian Romania.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Most of the Balkans was ruled by the Ottoman empire until the later 19th century, they were enemies of the Austrians during this time and wouldn't be receptive to immigrants from them.
What about after the Ottomans were virtually expelled from the Balkans in the 19th and early 20th centuries, though?

Dobruja was sparsely populated, so always in need of settlers.
Yep. Was the same true of Bessarabia, though?

If you look at the map pretty much all the areas were either ruled by german states or Russia, Poland and Hungary (who all utilized german settlers in their history). Exceptions being non-Transylvanian Romania.
Technically speaking, the only parts of Romania that got a lot of German settlement were those that were either a part of Austria-Hungary until 1918 (so, Transylvania, Bukovina, and the Banat) or those that actually have a coastline (specifically Dobruja and Bessarabia). Other than on their coastline, Dobruja and Bessarabia didn't actually receive a lot of German settlement.
 
Apr 2017
1,654
U.S.A.
What about after the Ottomans were virtually expelled from the Balkans in the 19th and early 20th centuries, though?

Yep. Was the same true of Bessarabia, though?

Technically speaking, the only parts of Romania that got a lot of German settlement were those that were either a part of Austria-Hungary until 1918 (so, Transylvania, Bukovina, and the Banat) or those that actually have a coastline (specifically Dobruja and Bessarabia). Other than on their coastline, Dobruja and Bessarabia didn't actually receive a lot of German settlement.
The newly independent Balkan states didn't want more foreigners in their countries.
 
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