Why Did French (Mostly) Disappear in Louisiana, But Not Quebec

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,567
Portugal
#12
I married a Cajun woman and had our daughter DNA searched. I was expecting French, German and maybe Native American gene markers to show up, but the test revealed, French, Spanish, Islenos. Sephardic and Ashkenazi gene markers. My Mother in Law was a Marcantel and that is a German family name!
I don't want to mess with your family names and ADN, but Marcantel surely doesn't seem a German family name. I would bet on some Latin language origins: Italian, Provençal (Occitan) or Catalan. And with some later changes.
 
Sep 2012
1,043
Tarkington, Texas
#13
When the Spanish settled in Louisiana and married into a local French family, the family normally spoke French in the home. After a couple of generations there was no Spanish spoken. Keep in mind that there are lots of Anglo last names in the Cajun genealogy in Louisiana. The Spanish settled in Plaquemines, St Bernard and Iberia Parishes. Much of the best farmland along the Mississippi was taken already.

According to the research I have done, Marcantel is German. The Swiss/German settlers the French brought in saved the colony. They were given land grants and they produced a lot of food. They were mainly sent to St John the Baptist Parish which was often referred to as the "German Coast". Many of the French settlers brought in before were not upstanding citizens and often took to the woods looking for precious metals. For many years the females brought in were from the prisons of France. New Orleans was famous for many years for its population of Red Haired prostitutes.
 
Jun 2017
348
maine
#14
I don't want to mess with your family names and ADN, but Marcantel surely doesn't seem a German family name. I would bet on some Latin language origins: Italian, Provençal (Occitan) or Catalan. And with some later changes.
A lot of surnames have gone through alterations and the original name may have been quite different. It really would take a generation-by-generation search backwards to determine a place of origin.
 
Sep 2012
1,043
Tarkington, Texas
#15
The Louisiana school system was set up for English language only. My ex-wife only spoke French until she went to school. She claims now she can't speak French but understands it. Things are different today. My daughter was in a French Immersion Program in Elementary School. They did not offer it in Middle School and her small private school only offered Spanish (some people had been missionaries in Central America). Two of my Grandsons graduated High School in Texas and they both took German.

The most misspelled Cajun family name is Schexnider. One more that comes to mind is Prudhomme. I went to school with a number of Spanish descent people, Romeros, Castilles, Cortez, Hernandezes, Manuels, Nunez's and Corbellos. I thought the Romeros and Corbellos were Italian, but they weren't.

Pruitt
 
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Likes: macon
Jun 2017
348
maine
#17
Perhaps or perhaps not. Immigrants often altered their last names to fit in with their new neighbors. For example, there is a family named "Burgess" in Massachusetts that is of Swedish descent (the original name was "Bjørnsson" but they found that no one could pronounce it. Many times a name is translated: the French "Roi" often becomes "King". The neighborhood is not necessarily English: my Norwegian aunt went from "Inger Helene" to "Kathleen" because the Irish American neighbors assured the family that Kathleen was a wonderful American name!
 
Sep 2012
1,043
Tarkington, Texas
#18
Savoy is on the border of the German speaking cantons of Switzerland. I would expect some crossovers when the French were offering free land! Savoy was also once Piedmontese.

There is a problem in spelling family names in Louisiana. The local Parish Priest would enter the names of Births, Baptisms and Deaths in a Register. The French and Irish Parish Priests would have had fits with German last names. The Kunz family came from Texas where it is spelled Kunz. In Louisiana it is spelled Koonce. I went to school with a Ray Koonce that told me his family name was French (?). Later German settlers could read and write and gave a better spelling of their names.

There is a Germanfest in Robert's Cove that I have attended. They make a Potato Stew just like my Mother in Law did!

Pruitt
 
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Likes: duncanness
Jun 2019
27
Reiche des Oneiros
#19
The answer is pretty damn obvious, gentlemen. Sometimes I can tolerate these things with patience, but when the answer is literally staring at you in the thighs, some things can no longer be tolerated. Gentlemen.