Why did Japan attack the USA?

May 2019
12
greece
#31
The Philippines have a number of minerals: Gold, Copper, Iron, Chromite and Coal. Oil was discovered off Palawan after the war. My Dad worked there a time or two as a Mud Engineer. The Japanese could have also sent food back to Japan. The PI was the world's largest producer of Manila Hemp (rope).

Pruitt
Right, it was discovered AFTER the war. Were the rest really so important that they balance the negative effects of war with the industrial powerhouse that was the USA?
 
May 2018
111
Houston, TX
#32
I have read that 14th part, but (I am no expert) it doesn't 'sound' like a declaration of war. I think it is something like "The Japanese Government regrets to have to notify hereby the American Government that in view of the attitude of the American Government it cannot but consider that it is impossible to reach an agreement through further negotiations."

Has seemed to me that, even if the U.S. had formally received it prior to the 1 p.m. deadline, the state department might have considered it just another round of Japanese dissembling. In fact (as I recall) the Magic intercept of the 14th part did reach Roosevelt on the morning of the 7th and it was certainly not considering a declaration of war. So, in the minds of the Japanese, they may have intended to maintain honor by the 1 p.m. delivery, it was unlikely to have been received by the U.S. as such, and the Japanese envoys should have realized that would be the American mindset. Just my thoughts about it.
 
Jun 2014
6,000
Lisbon, Portugal
#33
This seems mind-bogglingly stupid to me. I understand the us did an embargo on them, and they needed Malaysia and Indonesia to find alternative sources, but why attack the Philipphines? What is to be gained? I find it really doubtful that Roosevelt could have convinced the country to attack Japan for the sake of saving the british and dutch colonial empires. Or at least that's how it would have been seen.
Even if they were scared the united states MIGHT attack them, this is simply a possibility of defeat, whereas attacking them themselves made it a near- certainly. Especially since the outrage over the attach made the public hungry for revenge.
In fact it's a miracle that equally stupid Hitler came to their support, delaying Japan's defeat
I'm going to re-post one of my comments that I posted in some other discussion page discussing this very issue:

"(...)They needed to take out the Philippines and the US Pacific fleet because they stand in their way, but all of that was only possible because of the German success in Europe in 1940 - Japan saw it as a good opportunity to strike Western powers and acquire those resources they needed to continue to wage war against China.

Japan was not in anyway looking or even planning to take out the European possessions in Southeast Asia prior to the beginning of the Second World War in Europe, and you have to understand one thing: the Pacific War didn't start in 1939 or 1941, it started in 1931 and 1937. Every policy decision Japan made throughout the war was in the context of trying to subdue China."
 
Jun 2014
6,000
Lisbon, Portugal
#34
Why is it you repeatedly ignore Indochina and only refer to Japanese incursions in Manchuria and China?
Japan invaded Indochina specifically because of their war against China, and the US involvement in China's resistance against Japanese invasion played a major role in the Japanese decision to invade the French possessions in Indochina.

The path that lead to the war between USA and Japan didn't begun with the US embargo in the aftermath of the Japanese invasion of Indochina, it actually begun earlier when the US as early as 1938 begun to adopt trade restrictions with Japan because of the war against China.
 
Feb 2011
3,526
Amelia, Virginia, USA
#35
Japan invaded Indochina specifically because of their war against China, and the US involvement in China's resistance against Japanese invasion played a major role in the Japanese decision to invade the French possessions in Indochina.

The path that lead to the war between USA and Japan didn't begun with the US embargo in the aftermath of the Japanese invasion of Indochina, it actually begun earlier when the US as early as 1938 begun to adopt trade restrictions with Japan because of the war against China.
Northern Indochina was occupied to close supplies reaching the Chinese. In response, the British closed the Burma road and the US imposed some sanctions. This was 1940, and with Tripartite pact the US took this as evidence that Japan was acting in concert with, and perhaps at the behest of Germany. This misconception colored US diplomacy.
Occupation of southern Indochina in July 1941had no such justification, and was seen correctly as a step to war.
 
Jul 2016
9,304
USA
#36
Japan invaded Indochina specifically because of their war against China, and the US involvement in China's resistance against Japanese invasion played a major role in the Japanese decision to invade the French possessions in Indochina.

The path that lead to the war between USA and Japan didn't begun with the US embargo in the aftermath of the Japanese invasion of Indochina, it actually begun earlier when the US as early as 1938 begun to adopt trade restrictions with Japan because of the war against China.
The direct cause of the war was related to Indochina, that was the straw that broke the camel's back.