Why did most of India's Muslims not emigrate following Partition?

Jan 2019
153
Valencia
#21
And none of above cities are dominated by Muslims anymore.
You’re contradicting yourself. First you claim that Muslims didn’t move because they were poor and worked on the land, now Muslims have emigrated from the cities. The decline of Muslims as a percentage in the cities is more related to the surge of Hindus leaving their villages and arriving in the cities for work.

Most Muslims in west Bengal (and elsewhere, e.g. Bihar) were/are working off the land, and they stayed put.
Lol stop spreading your uninformed “knowledge” everywhere. Cities in Bihar like Patna, Darbhanga etc where Muslim dominated. Patna was known as Azimabad during the 1700’s and most smaller cities like Bhagalpur had their own Muslim quarters. There is also the famous city of Bihar Sharif which was a Muslim pilgrimage site.

Stop applying your own Bengali situation to the rest of India. We all know that Hindu Zamindars in Bengal were keeping Muslim Bengalis as labourers. I’m confused as to how Muslim Bengali descendants of Arab, Turk and Afghan nobility ended up working as labourers for Hindus?
 
Jul 2012
3,187
Dhaka
#22
You’re contradicting yourself. First you claim that Muslims didn’t move because they were poor and worked on the land, now Muslims have emigrated from the cities.
Okay, let's break it down for easy consumption.

Most Muslims in India were living off rural economy, had no assets of their own, and thus couldn't afford to emigrate. And they didn't.

The part of Muslims that didn't belong to 'Most' segment pointed out above, were living in cities and were relatively well off and they were the ones that did emigrate.

There, even a first-grader should be able to handle that.

The decline of Muslims as a percentage in the cities is more related to the surge of Hindus leaving their villages and arriving in the cities for work.
So you are contending that Muslims in urban areas didn't emigrate?

Lol stop spreading your uninformed “knowledge” everywhere. Cities in Bihar like Patna, Darbhanga etc where Muslim dominated. Patna was known as Azimabad during the 1700’s and most smaller cities like Bhagalpur had their own Muslim quarters. There is also the famous city of Bihar Sharif which was a Muslim pilgrimage site.
See above.

Stop applying your own Bengali situation to the rest of India. We all know that Hindu Zamindars in Bengal were keeping Muslim Bengalis as labourers.
Bengali and Bihari Muslims account for a quarter or more of Muslims currently living in India. Therefore, why they didn't emigrate should be a good pointer to the overall trend.
 
Last edited:
Jan 2019
153
Valencia
#23
Most Muslims in India were living off rural economy, had no assets of their own, and thus couldn't afford to emigrate. And they didn't.
You’re making loads of claims but not providing any sources. Meanwhile, the assumption that Muslims are more prevalent in the cities is well accepted:

https://m.timesofindia.com/india/Mo...ban-areas-than-rural/articleshow/48680765.cms

You’re making a statement and expecting us to accept it as fact. Don’t delude yourself.

There, even a first-grader should be able to handle that.
I dunno. Considering the level of education in Bangladesh, I think many graduates in your nation may struggle with that.

So you are contending that Muslims in urban areas didn't emigrate?
Did I? I merely addressed your hilariously uninformed contention that most Muslim didn’t emigrate because they lived in rural areas. As if that stopped the largely rural Punjabi Muslim population from moving to Pakistan.

Why should I “see above” when you have yet to address the points?

Bengali and Bihari Muslims account for a quarter or more of Muslims currently living in India.
Bengali and Bihari Muslims are not remotely similar. You seem to be trying to group them together for some reason. Unfortunately for you, while Bengali Muslims (your ancestors) where mainly labourers, Bihari Muslims were a largely urban population like the rest of India.

Your overall argument is unfortunately very incoherent. Also can you answer the question below:

I’m confused as to how Muslim Bengali descendants of Arab, Turk and Afghan nobility ended up working as labourers for Hindus?
 
Jul 2012
3,187
Dhaka
#24
You’re making loads of claims but not providing any sources. Meanwhile, the assumption that Muslims are more prevalent in the cities is well accepted:

https://m.timesofindia.com/india/Mo...ban-areas-than-rural/articleshow/48680765.cms

You’re making a statement and expecting us to accept it as fact. Don’t delude yourself.
Still didn't get it? Let's quote from your source:

"While only 29% of Hindus live in urban areas, 40% of Muslims and Christians .. live in towns and cities."

If we deduct 40 from 100, we get 60. And 60 is greater than 40. Therefore most Muslims live in rural areas.

I dunno. Considering the level of education in Bangladesh, I think many graduates in your nation may struggle with that.



Did I? I merely addressed your hilariously uninformed contention that most Muslim didn’t emigrate because they lived in rural areas. As if that stopped the largely rural Punjabi Muslim population from moving to Pakistan.
Violence.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,432
India
#25
And none of above cities are dominated by Muslims anymore. Why? Because they emigrated.

Most Muslims in west Bengal (and elsewhere, e.g. Bihar) were/are working off the land, and they stayed put.
Old city of these cities are still dominated by Muslims, in last 70 years these cities got expanded extensively and leading to more Hindus migrating to newer part of the city and city turning towards a Hindu majority.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,376
New Delhi, India
#26
Delhi has 13% Muslims (that roughly means among any eight people one is a Muslim). Some areas (Shahjahanabad, Okhla, Seelampur, etc.) have a much larger percentage of Muslims.
But how does that matter, they are citizens of India. :)
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,432
India
#27
So much for the two-nation theory!
The migrations of North Indian Muslims to Pakistan lead to deep ethnic divide between Sindhis and Muhajirs, infact anti-Urdu feeling ran deep among Sindhi Muslims , in East Pakistan Bihari Muhajirs sided with Pakistan in 1971 war and Bengali vs Bihari Muhajir tension was deep and Bihari Muhajirs ended up as a stateless people after 1971 war unwanted by both Pakistan and Bangladesh, even plan to settle them in South Punjab was met with big resistance. Over the year many tried to enter Pakistan illegally.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,432
India
#28
Delhi has 13% Muslims (that roughly means among any eight people one is a Muslim). Some areas (Shahjahanabad, Okhla, Seelampur, etc.) have a much larger percentage of Muslims.
But how does that matter, they are citizens of India. :)
In Hyderabad Muslim are still in majority in old city while Hindus constitute 70% of the population in Greater Hyderabad city.
 
Jul 2012
3,187
Dhaka
#29
The migration to Sindh was of a different nature to that in Punjab as the migrants to Sindh were ethnically heterogenous and were linguistically different to the locals. The migrants were also more educated than the native, and predominantly rural,[24][not in citation given] Sindhi Muslims who had been less educated and less prosperous than the former Sindhi Hindu residents. The migrants, who were urban, also tended to regard the local Sindhis as backwards and subservient to landowners.[25]

Prior to the partition, the majority of urban Sindh's population had been Hindu[26] but after the independence of Pakistan in 1947, the majority of Sindh's Hindus migrated to India,[23] although a substantial number of Hindus did remain in Sindh.[27] 1.1 million Muslims from Uttar Pradesh, Bombay Presidency, Delhi and Rajasthan settled in their place; half in Karachi and the rest across Sindh's other cities.[23][7] By the 1951 census, the migrants constituted 57 percent of the population of Karachi, 65 percent in Hyderabad and 55 percent in Sukkur. As Karachi was the capital of the new nation, educated urban migrants from Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Bombay, Bihar and Hyderabad Deccan preferred it as their site of settlement for better access to employment opportunities.
Source: Muhajir people - Wikipedia

There, color coded for easy reading.
 

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